Review: QardioBase Smart Scale is a Great Idea that Misses the Mark

From years of being chubby, I know that losing weight is all about awareness. The basic principle remains: burn more calories than you eat. But how well you’re able to track exercise, calories, and how your weight changes is what allows you to build momentum towards your goal. QardioBase ($129.99) is a smart scale that connects to the Qardio app to deliver your weight, body fat percentage, and BMI. But accuracy is the name of the game, and QardioBase has a long way to go.

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I love the idea of the QardioBase. It’s circular and a soft white color set upon little feet that makes it seem to hover above the floor. It can tell you more than just weight, which if accurate, would give you a more well-rounded picture of how you’re doing. However, QardioBase has quite a few fatal flaws.

Firstly, good luck standing on this thing. It comes with extra feet you can attach, and believe me, you’re going to want to use them. I was foolish enough not to, which meant just using the thing was a balancing act. I’d put one foot on and it would begin to tilt to the side as I got the other foot on just in time. My feet had to be dead center or it would tilt, causing me to jump off as the feeling of falling set-in.

Next, measuring body fat isn’t really something a scale can do very well. Of course, I have no way to verify how close or far off the smart scale is to the number it gave me, but let’s just say there’s no way it’s right. This created suspicion, which then caused me to research and discover that others have pointed out the improbability of a scale being able to determine body fat. None-the-less, I don’t really need to know how much body fat and muscle I have to successfully lose weight. It would be an awesome bonus, but accurate weight measurement would be enough for me. Sadly, QardioBase couldn’t deliver on this either.

In a true attempt to test the scale, I spent the last couple weeks lightly tracking my calories and cutting back while increasing my day-to-day movement. I didn’t make any huge changes, but enough that I’d expect to drop a pound in half a month. So I stepped on the scale this week to see if there were any changes. And to my surprise I’d lost a whopping 2.5 pounds. Then I stepped on the scale again and guess what — .3 pounds lost this time. That’s a huge fluctuation when checking my weight twice within a 30 second period of time. Losing weight is frustrating enough on its own, you don’t need a confusing scale to make it worse.

Last and least, the Qardio app didn’t log my recent weigh-in even though I had the app open on my phone right in front of me. And I don’t see any button in the app that says, “weigh-in” or anything of the sort. I completely closed the app and reopened it to give it a second chance, alas it didn’t work.

Pros:

  • Beautiful design

  • Great idea

Cons:

  • Weight fluctuates from one second to the next — inaccuracy

  • Wobbles!

Final Verdict:

A scale that says you’re five pounds lighter or heavier than you actually are isn’t a problem so long as the margin of error holds true. You would still be able to recognize the loss of pounds over time. QardioBase doesn’t do that. It fluctuates, it wobbles, and it’s too expensive to have this many flaws.

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Conner Carey's picture

Conner Carey's writing can be found at conpoet.com. She is currently writing a book, creating lots of content, and writing poetry via @conpoet on Instagram. She lives in an RV full-time with her mom, Jan and dog, Jodi as they slow-travel around the country.