iPad

What iPad Do I Have? How to Identify Apple's iPad Models & Generations (2022 Update)

What generation is my iPad? The easiest way to identify which iPad versions you have is to find your iPad's model number. 

If you want to buy some iPad accessories or sell your iPad online, you might be stuck on the question which iPad do I have? Our iPad comparison list of generations and models includes the latest iPads, so you'll be able to find your device no matter when it came out.

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iPad Models: How to Find iPad Model Numbers

The easiest way to begin your search for which kind of iPad you own is to find your device's model number. The first method doesn't even require that you turn on your iPad; all you need to do is look on the back of your device. You'll see "iPad" engraved there, and underneath you'll see smaller print, including the capital letter "A", followed by a series of numbers. That's your model number. If you have your device in a case and don't want to take it out or would rather not have to get out a magnifying glass to see the tiny print, you can use this method for iPad model number lookup:

  1. Open the Settings app.

  2. Tap General.

  3. Tap About.

  4. In the Model Number section, you may see a longer number that ends with "A". This is your iPad's SKU number. To view your model number, tap once on this section and you'll get a shorter number that begins with "A". This is also the screen you need for an iPad serial number lookup.

Now that you have your model number, it's time to use that information to learn how to tell what iPad you have.  

Related: What Kind of iPhone Do I Have? All iPhone Generations & Their Model Numbers 

What Generation Is My iPad: iPad Versions & Model Numbers

If you're wondering, "What generation iPad do I have," you've come to the right place. In the charts below, look for your iPad's model number to find out which version of the iPad you own. Tap on the model name to learn more about it.

iPad Models & Generations

Name Model Number
iPad 1st Generation A1219, A1337
iPad 2nd Generation A1395, A1396, A1397
iPad 3rd Generation A1403, A1416, A1430 
iPad 4th Generation A1458, A1459, A1460
iPad 5th Generation A1822, A1823
iPad 6th Generation A1893, A1954
iPad 7th Generation A2197, A2200, A2198
iPad 8th Generation A2270, A2428, A2429, A2430
iPad 9th Generation A2602, A2604, A2603, A2605
 

iPad mini Models & Generations

iPad mini 1 A1432, A1454, A1455
iPad mini 2 A1489, A1490, A1491
iPad mini 3 A1599, A1600
iPad mini 4 A1538, A1550
iPad mini 5 A2133, A2124, A2126, A2125
iPad mini 6 A2567, A2568, A2569

iPad Air Models & Generations

iPad Air 1 A1474, A1475, A1476
iPad Air 2 A1566, A1567
iPad Air 3 A2152, A2123, A2153, A2154
iPad Air 4 A2316, A2324, A2325, A2072
iPad Air 5 A2588, A2589, A2591

iPad Pro Models & Generations

iPad Pro 12.9 inch 1st Generation A1584, A1652
iPad Pro 9.7 inch A1673, A1674, A1675
iPad Pro 10.5 inch A1701, A1709
iPad Pro 12.9 inch 2nd Generation A1670, A1671
iPad Pro 12.9 inch 3rd Generation A1876, A2014, A1895, A1983
iPad Pro 11 inch 1st Generation A1980, A2013, A1934, A1979
iPad Pro 11 inch 2nd Generation

A2228, A2068, A2230, A2231

iPad Pro 12.9 inch 4th Generation A2229, A2069, A2232, A2233 
iPad Pro 11 inch 3rd Generation A2377, A2459, A2301, A2460
iPad Pro 12.9 inch 5th Generation

A2378, A2461, A2379, A2462 

iPad Generations List: All the Kinds of iPads & Their Features

Below you will find all the generations of the iPad in chronological order, with details and specifications including their model numbers. If you're wondering what is the newest iPad, that will depend on whether you mean the iPad, iPad Air, iPad Mini, or iPad Pro.

iPad

Year: 2010

Model: A1219 (Wi-Fi), A1337 (Wi-Fi and 3G)

Capacity: 16 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB

​Also identified by: black front bezel, 30 pin connector, SIM tray (standard size)

ipad versions

iPad 2

Year: 2011

Model: A1395 (Wi-Fi), A1396 (GSM Model), A1397 (CDMA Model)

Capacity: 16 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB

​Also identified by: white or black front bezel, 30 pin connector, micro-SIM tray on the A1396, FaceTime and rear cameras.​

ipad a1395 a1396 a1397

iPad (3rd Generation)

Year: 2012

Model: A1416 (Wi-Fi), A1430 (Wi-Fi and Cellular), A1403 (Wi-Fi and Cellular (VZ)

Capacity: 16 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB

​Also identified by: white or black front bezel, 30 pin connector, micro-SIM tray on right side, FaceTime and iSight cameras

ipad a1416, a1430, a1403

iPad (4th Generation)

Year: 2012

Model: A1458 (Wi-Fi), A1459 (Wi-Fi and Cellular), A1460 (Wi-Fi and Cellular (MM)

Capacity: 16 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB, 128 GB

​Also identified by: white or black front bezel, 9.7-inch Retina Display, Lightning connector, micro-SIM tray on right side, FaceTime HD and iSight cameras.

ipad a1458 a1459 a1460

iPad (5th Generation)

Year: 2017

Model: A1822 (Wi-Fi), A1823 (Wi-Fi and Cellular)

Capacity: 32 GB, 128 GB

​Also identified by: white or black front bezel, 9.7-inch Retina Display, Lightning connector, nano-SIM tray on right side, FaceTime HD and iSight cameras, Touch ID, aluminum casing in silver, gold, or space gray.

ipad a1822 a1823

iPad (6th Generation)

Year: 2018

Model: A1893, A1954

Capacity: 32 GB, 128 GB

Also identified by: white or black front bezel, 9.7-inch Retina Display, Lightning connector, nano-SIM tray on right side for Wi-Fi and Cellular, FaceTime HD and 8MP cameras, Touch ID, aluminum housing in silver, gold, or space gray, Apple Pencil support. 

apple ipad for students

iPad (7th Generation)

Year: 2019

Model: A2197, A2200, A2198

Capacity: 32 GB, 128 GB

Also identified by: white or black front bezel, 10.2-inch Retina Display, Lightning Connector, Smart Connector, nano-SIM tray on right side for Cellular and Wi-Fi, FaceTime HD and 8MP cameras, Touch ID, aluminum housing in silver, gold, or space gray, first-generation Apple Pencil support, Smart Keyboard support.

7th generation ipad

iPad (8th Generation)

Year: 2020

Model: A2270, A2428, A2429, A2430

Capacity: 32 GB, 128 GB

Also identified by: white or black front bezel, 10.2-inch Retina Display, Lightning Connector, Smart Connector, nano-SIM tray on right side for Cellular and Wi-Fi, FaceTime HD and 8MP cameras, Touch ID, aluminum housing in silver, gold, or space gray, first-generation Apple Pencil support, Smart Keyboard support.

Note: This model may be difficult to distinguish from its predecessor, the iPad 7th Generation, simply by looking at it. The 8th Generation iPad is identical in all physical features and even comes in the same colors. The largest difference is in processing capabilities: the 8th Generation iPad uses an A12 bionic chip. Use the model number for accurate identification.

iPad (9th Generation)

Year: 2021

Model: A2602, A2604, A2603, A2605 

Capacity: 64 GB, 256 GB

Also identified by: black front bezel, 10.2-inch Retina Display, Lightning Connector, Smart Connector, nano-SIM tray on right side for Cellular and Wi-Fi, FaceTime HD and 8MP cameras, Touch ID, aluminum housing in silver or space gray, first-generation Apple Pencil support, Smart Keyboard support.

Note: This model looks very similar to the previous models, the seventh- and eighth-generation iPads. This model may be difficult to distinguish from its predecessor, the iPad (8th generation), simply by looking at it. The 9th Generation iPad is identical in all physical features and even comes in the same colors. The largest difference is in processing capabilities: the ninth-generation iPad uses an A13 bionic chip, making it even faster and more powerful. Use the model number for accurate identification.

iPad 9th Generation

​How Do I Know What iPad I Have: iPad mini

iPad mini

Year: Late 2012

Model: A1432 Wi-Fi, A1454 Wi-Fi and Cellular, A1455 Wi-Fi and Cellular (MM)

Capacity: 16 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB

​Also identified by: White or black front bezel, Lightning connector, nano-SIM tray on left side, FaceTime HD and iSight cameras, aluminum housing in slate or silver.

ipad a1432 a1454 a1455

iPad mini 2

Year: Late 2013, early 2014.

Model: A1489 Wi-Fi, A1490 Wi-Fi and Cellular, A1491 Wi-Fi and Cellular (TD-LTE)

Capacity: 16 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB, 128 GB

​Also identified by: White or black front bezel, 7.9-inch Retina Display, Lightning connector, nano-SIM tray on left side, FaceTime HD and iSight cameras, aluminum housing in space gray or silver.

ipad a1489 a1490 a1491

iPad mini 3

Year: Late 2014

Model: A1599, A1600 Wi-Fi and Cellular

Capacity: 16 GB, 64 GB, 128 GB

​Also identified by: White or black front bezel, 7.9-inch Retina Display, Lightning connector, nano-SIM tray on left side, Touch ID, FaceTime HD and iSight cameras, aluminum housing in space gray, silver, or gold.

ipad a1599 a1600

iPad mini 4

Year: Late 2015

Model: A1538, A1550 Wi-Fi and Cellular

Capacity: 16 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB, 128 GB

​Also identified by: White or black front bezel, 7.9-inch Retina Display, Lightning connector, nano-SIM tray on right side, Touch ID, FaceTime HD and iSight cameras, aluminum housing in space gray, silver, or gold.

ipad a1538 a 1550

iPad mini 5

Year: 2019

Model: A2133, A2124, A2126, A2125​

Capacity: 64 GB, 256 GB

Also identified by: 7.9-inch Retina display, wide color display, True Tone display technology, aluminum housing comes in silver, space gray, or gold, Lightning connector, nano-SIM tray on right side, Touch ID, first-generation Apple Pencil support.

ipad mini 5

iPad mini 6

Year: 2021

Model: A2567, A2568, A2569 

Capacity: 64 GB, 256 GB

Also identified by: 8.3-inch Retina display, wide color display, True Tone display technology, aluminum housing comes in space gray, pink, purple, or starlight, USB-C connector, nano-SIM tray on right side, Touch ID, second-generation Apple Pencil support.

iPad mini 6th Generation

What Kind of iPad Do I Have: iPad Air

iPad Air

Year: Late 2013, Early 2014

Model: A1474 Wi-Fi, A1475 Wi-Fi and Cellular, A1476 Wi-Fi, Cellular (TD-LTE)

Capacity: 16, 32, 64, 128 GB

​Also identified by: White or black front bezel, 9.7-inch Retina Display, Lightning connector, nano-SIM tray on right side, Touch ID, FaceTime HD and iSight cameras, aluminum housing in space gray or silver.

ipad a1474 a1475 a1476

iPad Air 2​

Year: Late 2014

Model: A1566, A1567 Wi-Fi and Cellular 

Capacity: 16, 32, 64, 128 GB

​Also identified by: White or black front bezel, 9.7-inch Retina Display, Lightning connector, nano-SIM tray on right side, Touch ID, FaceTime HD and iSight cameras, aluminum housing in space gray, silver, or gold.

ipad a1566 ipad a1567

iPad Air 3 

Year: 2019

Model: A2152, A2123, A2153, A2154

Capacity: 64 GB, 256 GB

Also identified by: 10.5-inch Retina display, wide color display, True Tone display technology, aluminum housing in silver, space gray, or gold, Lightning connector, nano-SIM tray on right side, Touch ID, support for first-generation Apple Pencil and Smart Keyboard.

ipad air 4

iPad Air 4 

Year: 2020

Model: A2316, A2324, A2325, A2072 

Capacity: 64 GB, 256 GB

Also identified by: 10.9-inch Liquid Retina edge-to-edge display (the most obvious identifier for this model, as edge-to-edge display is new to iPad Air as of fall 2020). New colors Green and Sky Blue, no home button, next-generation Touch ID on top button. 

iPad Air 5 

Year: 2022

Model: A2588, A2589, A2591 

Capacity: 64 GB, 256 GB

Also identified by: 10.9-inch Liquid Retina edge-to-edge display. New colors Pink, Purple, and Blue, no home button, next-generation Touch ID on top button. 

iPad Air 5th Generation

​What iPad Do I Have: iPad Pro

iPad Pro 12.9 inch

Year: 2015

Model: A1584, A1652 Wi-Fi and Cellular 

Capacity: 32 GB, 128 GB, 256 GB

​Also identified by: White or black front bezel, 12.9-inch Retina Display, Lightning port, Smart Connector, nano-SIM tray on right side, Touch ID, FaceTime HD camera and iSight camera, aluminum housing in space gray, silver, or gold, four-speaker audio, Apple Pencil support, Smart Keyboard support.

ipad a1584 ipad a1652

iPad Pro 9.7 inch

Year: 2016

Model: A1673, A1674 Wi-Fi and Cellular​, A1675 Wi-Fi and Cellular. 

Capacity: 32 GB, 128 GB, 256 GB

​Also identified by: White or black front bezel, 9.7-inch Retina Display, True Tone display technology, Lightning connector, Smart Connector, nano-SIM tray on right side on Wi-Fi and Cellular versions, Touch ID, FaceTime HD camera and iSight camera with flash, aluminum housing in space gray, silver, gold, or rose gold, four-speaker audio, Apple Pencil support, Smart Keyboard support.

  ipad a1673 ipad a1674 ipad a1675

iPad Pro 10.5 inch

Year: 2017

Model: A1701, A1709 Wi-Fi and Cellular​.

Capacity: 64 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB

​Also identified by: White or black front bezel, 10.5-inch Retina Display, True Tone display technology, ProMotion technology, Wide color display (P3), Lightning connector, Smart Connector, nano-SIM tray on right side on Wi-Fi and Cellular version, Touch ID, FaceTime HD camera and iSight cameras with flash, aluminum housing in space gray, silver, gold, or rose gold, four-speaker audio, Apple Pencil support, Smart Keyboard support.

ipad a1701 ipad a1709

iPad Pro 12.9-inch (2nd Generation)

Year: 2017

Model: A1670, A1671 Wi-Fi and Cellular​.

Capacity: 64 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB

​Also identified by: White or black front bezel, 12.9-inch Retina Display, True Tone display technology, ProMotion technology, Wide color display (P3), Lightning connector, Smart Connector, nano-SIM tray on right side on Wi-Fi and Cellular version, Touch ID, FaceTime HD camera and iSight cameras with flash, aluminum housing in space gray, silver, or gold, four-speaker audio, Apple Pencil support, Smart Keyboard support.

ipad a1670 ipad a1671

iPad Pro 12.9-inch (3rd Generation)

Year: 2018

Model: A1876, A2014, A1895, A1983

Capacity:  64 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB, 1 TB

Also identified by: Edge-to-edge display, no Home button, black front bezel, 12.9-inch Liquid Retina Display, ProMotion technology, TruTone display, Wide color display (P3), USB-C Connector, Smart Connector, nano-SIM tray on right side on Wi-Fi and Cellular version, Face ID, TrueDepth camera and 12MP back camera, aluminum housing in space gray or silver, four-speaker audio, 2nd-generation Apple Pencil support, Smart Keyboard Folio support.

new ipad

iPad Pro 11 inch

Year: 2018

Model: A1980, A2013, A1934, A1979  

Capacity: 64 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB, 1 TB

Also identified by: Edge-to-edge display, no Home button, Face ID, black front bezel, 11-inch Liquid Retina Display, ProMotion technology, Wide Color Display (P3), True Tone Display Technology, aluminum housing in space gray or silver,  USB-C Connector, Smart Connector, nano-SIM tray on right side on Pro Wi-Fi and Cellular version, TrueDepth camera, 12MP back camera, four-speaker audio, 2nd-generation Apple Pencil support, Smart Keyboard Folio support.

apple ipad

iPad Pro 11 inch (2nd Generation)

Year: 2020

Model: A2228, A2068, A2230

Capacity: 128 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB, 1 TB

Also identified by: Edge-to-edge display, no Home button, Face ID, black front bezel, 11-inch Liquid Retina Display, LED-backlit Multi-Touch display with IPS technology, ProMotion technology, Wide Color Display (P3), True Tone Display Technology, antireflective coating, aluminum housing in space gray or silver with fingerprint-resistant coating,  USB-C Connector, Smart Connector, nano-SIM tray on right side on Wi-Fi and Cellular version, TrueDepth camera, new 10MP ultrawide camera and 12MP back cameras, five microphones and four-speaker audio, LiDAR Scanner, 2nd-generation Apple Pencil support, Smart Keyboard Folio support, Magic Keyboard with trackpad support.

ipad pro 11 inch 2020

iPad Pro 12.9 inch (4th Generation)

Year: 2020

Model: A2229, A2069, A2232

Capacity: 128 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB, 1 TB

Also identified by: Edge-to-edge display, no Home button, Face ID, black front bezel, 11-inch Liquid Retina Display, LED-backlit Multi-Touch display with IPS technology, ProMotion technology, Wide Color Display (P3), True Tone Display Technology, antireflective coating, aluminum housing in space gray or silver with fingerprint-resistant coating,  USB-C Connector, Smart Connector, nano-SIM tray on right side on Wi-Fi and Cellular version, TrueDepth camera, new 10MP ultrawide camera and 12MP back cameras, five microphones and four-speaker audio, LiDAR Scanner, 2nd-generation Apple Pencil support, Smart Keyboard Folio support, Magic Keyboard with trackpad support.

ipad pro 12.9 inch 2020

iPad Pro 11 inch (3rd Generation)

Year: 2018

Model: A2377, A2459, A2301, A2460

Capacity: 128 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB, 1 TB, 2 TB

Also identified by: Edge-to-edge display, no Home button, Face ID, black front bezel, 11-inch Liquid Retina Display, LED-backlit Multi-Touch display with IPS technology, ProMotion technology, Wide Color Display (P3), True Tone Display Technology, antireflective coating, aluminum housing in space gray or silver with fingerprint-resistant coating,  USB-C Connector, Smart Connector, nano-SIM tray on right side on Wi-Fi and Cellular version, TrueDepth camera, new 10MP ultrawide camera and 12MP back cameras, five microphones and four-speaker audio, LiDAR Scanner, 2nd-generation Apple Pencil support, Smart Keyboard Folio support, Magic Keyboard with trackpad support.

iPad Pro 12.9 inch (5th Generation)

Year: 2021

Model: A2378, A2461, A2379, A2462 

Capacity: 128GB, 256GB, 512GB, 1TB, 2TB

Also identified by: Edge-to-edge display, no Home button, Face ID, black front bezel, 12.9-inch XDR Liquid Retina Display, mini LED-backlit Multi-Touch display with IPS technology, ProMotion technology, 2D backlighting system with 2596 full‑array local dimming zones, Wide Color Display (P3), True Tone Display Technology, antireflective coating, aluminum housing in space gray or silver with fingerprint-resistant coating,  USB-C Connector, Smart Connector, nano-SIM tray on right side on Wi-Fi and Cellular version, TrueDepth camera, new 10MP ultrawide camera and 12MP back cameras, five microphones and four-speaker audio, LiDAR Scanner, 2nd-generation Apple Pencil support, Smart Keyboard Folio support, Magic Keyboard with trackpad support.

​Did You Identify Your iPad? 

Whether you're looking to buy some iPad accessories or sell your iPad online so you can purchase a new one for business or pleasure, ​I hope this article has helped you figure out which iPad you own. I'll be sure to add to it as Apple releases new versions of the iPad!

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How to Connect iPad Pro to an External Monitor

Connect iPad to Monitor to see your iPad Pro's interface on a bigger display or use your iPad Pro in a presentation.

Did you know that you can connect your iPad Pro to an external monitor? An iPadPro/external monitor combination can help you see your work on a bigger scale, and with some apps, like iMovie, you can even see your project displayed on the external monitor while you edit it on your iPad Pro. Let's dig into how to connect your iPad Pro to an external monitor.

Related: What iPad Do I Have? How to Identify Apple's Different iPad Models & Generations

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Connect iPad Pro to Apple Pro Display XDR

This method requires a 5th-Generation iPad Pro 12.9-inch or a 3rd-Generation iPad Pro 11-inch. If you have an Apple Pro Display XDR, you should be able to connect either of these iPad Pro models to the monitor with the monitor's included Thunderbolt cable. For more on new ways to use your iPad Pro, check out our free Tip of the Day newsletter.

  1. Make sure your Apple Display XDR is plugged into a power source.
  2. Plug your Thunderbolt 3 Pro Cable into the display.
  3. Plug the other end of the cable into your iPad Pro's charging port.

That's it! Your Apple Display XDR should now mirror your iPad Pro's screen.

Connect iPad Pro to External Monitor

If you don't have an Apple Pro Display XDR, you can still connect your iPad Pro to an external monitor if you have a model with a USB-C or Thunderbolt/USB 4 connector. If you're not sure which connector your iPad Pro has, here are the models with a USB-C connector:

  • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (3rd and 4th generation)

  • iPad Pro 11-inch (1st and 2nd generation)

And here are the models with a Thunderbolt/USB 4 connector:

  • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (5th generation)

  • iPad Pro 11-inch (3rd generation)

Even if your iPad Pro's charging cable is not compatible with the ports on your external monitor, don't worry. You may still be able to connect your iPad Pro and monitor using an adapter. You'll need one of these adapters, depending on whether your external monitor has a VGA or HDMI port:

  • USB-C HDMI adapter
  • USB-C VGA adapter

Many adapters you can buy, like this one from CDW, have both HDMI and VGA ports.

Now that you've got your adapter, here's how you connect your iPad Pro to your external monitor:

  1. Plug your USB-C HDMI and/or VGA adapter into your iPad Pro's charging port.
  2. Plug the appropriate end of your HDMI or VGA cable into the port on the adapter.
  3. Plug the other end of the cable into the HDMI or VGA port on your powered-on external monitor.
  4. If necessary, select the correct input source on your external monitor. If you need help doing this, you'll need to consult the manual for your particular monitor.

There you have it! Now you should be able to connect your iPad Pro to a monitor with ease. You can also learn more about handy external keyboard shortcuts on your iPad

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Why Is My iPad So Slow? Learn How to Fix & Speed Up Any iPad (iPadOS 15 Update)

iPad lagging? Here's how to fix a slow iPad. You can even speed up an old iPad!

If you have an old iPad, it may not be as fast as it used to be, leaving you wondering, "Why is my iPad slow?" There are many reasons why your iPad may be running more slowly than when you first bought it. Whether you have an original iPad, iPad 2, iPad mini, iPad mini 2 ,or a newer iPad version like the iPad 9 or iPad mini 6, we'll cover why your iPad is running slow and lagging, and learn how to speed up an iPad, old or new, and improve its overall performance.

Related: Which iPad Do I Have? How to Identify the Different iPad Models & Generations

iPad Slow? 14 Ways to Fix a Slow iPad

Let's get into why your iPad is slow and how to fix it. We'll go over Wi-Fi connection, internet speed, updating iPadOS, how to reset your iPad, how to delete apps on an iPad, how to clear your cache or cached data, and more. For more great iPad troubleshooting advice, check out our free Tip of the Day. If you're having trouble with your iPad not turning on, instead of just running slow, we've got some common fixes for that as well. Or, if you're eagerly awaiting the next iPadOS update, check out our article that covers all the rumors currently circling about the tablet's operating system

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1. Has Apple Throttled My iPad?

I don't think you'd be paranoid to wonder if your iPad is slowing down due to throttling. After all, Apple has slowed down processor speeds on older iPhones in the past, so there's a possibility it could be happening to older iPads as well, right? Despite Apple's deliberate slowing of iPhone processing speed to prevent unexpected device shutdown, throttling is most likely not the reason your iPad is lagging. This is because Apple "dynamically manages performance" for the iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, iPhone SE, iPhone 7, and iPhone 7 Plus only. Of course, Apple did hide the truth about throttling older iPhones for far too long, creating a trust gap with customers; but for this issue, I'm going to choose to believe the tech giant learned its lesson and won't make the same mistake again. 

2. Check Your Internet Connection

If your iPad started slowing down out of the blue or slows down intermittently, you may want to troubleshoot your internet connection. Here are a few things to try:

Connect to a different Wi-Fi signal and see if your problem goes away. If so, your iPad was probably being slowed down by a weak Wi-Fi signal; start by moving your Wi-Fi router closer to where you usually use your iPad; you can also elevate your router to improve its signal, and make sure your router isn't placed close to a microwave, which can interfere with signal strength. 

If the above steps don't help, try restarting by turning off your iPad, then unplugging your modem and router for at least 30 seconds. Plug your modem and router back in, wait until no new indicator lights are blinking, then turn your iPad back on and see if things have improved.

Do An Internet Speed Test

ipad speed test

Image courtesy Ookla/speedtest.net

It's also worthwhile to check on your internet speed; there are lots of different speed tests available online; a favorite of mine is fast.com, which quickly shows you how many Mbps, or megabits per second, you have available for downloads. If you're looking for more information, try Ookla, which lets you know your connection's download and upload speed, as well as Ping (the reaction time of your connection, measured in ms, milliseconds.) 

If most of what you use your iPad for consists of downloading activities such as streaming movies and videos, you'll probably only need to use fast.com and make sure your internet speed is keeping up with your household's demand. AT&T also has a great Download Speed Calculator you can use to see approximately how much download speed all your various devices and activities require.   

If you use your iPad primarily for creating and uploading work such as videos to the internet, or if you frequently make calls using services like Skype, you'll need to make sure your upload speed is up to snuff as well. Here's another great tool that lets you enter all your devices and typical usage, calculates your needed download and upload speed, and refers you to all the area internet service providers that can meet your needs.

If you've restarted your router and made sure it's optimally placed, and have run a speed test that shows your internet service is fast enough to meet the needs of your household, your slow iPad problem is most likely an issue with the device itself. Let's go through the different possible ways things could be going wrong, and how to fix them. 

3. Update to the Latest iOS or iPadOS

Some folks with older iPads have experienced slowdowns after updating to the newest version of iPadOS, but is this the fault of the operating system? The answer to this question is... kind of. New operating systems are meant to fix glitches, bugs, and security issues, which can make your iPad faster, but they also introduce features that might strain the processing speed of older iPads. It's also an unavoidable fact that as time marches on, some devices are simply left out of iPadOS updates. Clearly, then, advice to update your iPad to the latest OS doesn't work for people whose devices have been left behind by Apple's software developers. However, iPadOS 15 should speed up devices rather than slowing them down like some past updates.

  • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (4th generation)
  • iPad Pro 11-inch (2nd generation)
  • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (3rd generation)
  • iPad Pro 11-inch (1st generation)
  • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (2nd generation)
  • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (1st generation)
  • iPad Pro 10.5-inch
  • iPad Pro 9.7-inch
  • iPad (9th generation)
  • iPad (8th generation)
  • iPad (7th generation)
  • iPad (6th generation)
  • iPad (5th generation)
  • iPad mini (6th generation)
  • iPad mini (5th generation)
  • iPad mini (4th generation)
  • iPad Air (4th generation)
  • iPad Air (3rd generation)
  • iPad Air 2

iPadOS 15 Compatible iPads

4. Restart Your iPad

If you haven't already done so while checking your internet connection and updating iPadOS, the next thing I'd recommend is to restart your iPad. Restarting your iPad won't delete any of your data or settings; all you're doing is turning off your device, then turning it on again to reboot your iPad. Rebooting clears your RAM (random access memory) and stopping all processes that are currently taking place. If you have too many apps running, music playing, and so on, everything can slow to a crawl if there isn't enough RAM to keep up. To restart: 

  1. Press and hold the Top or Side button until you see the slider appear.
  2. Drag the slider to power off. 
  3. Wait a minute or two, then press the Top or Side button again until the Apple logo appears; your device will then restart. 

5. Memory vs. Storage: Clear Out Storage on iPad

Read this helpful article on the difference between memory and storage; it explains that the long term space available to store apps, videos, documents, photos, and music on your iPad is what's known as storage and RAM is the space available on your iPad for data currently in use. While RAM and storage are two different things, iPadOS will shuffle data in and out of the empty portion of your long term storage, to help the RAM work as quickly as possible. If your device storage is almost full, then it's much slower to get that data in and out. Something you can do to help iPadOS have less to manage, and therefore speed up your iPad, is to clear items from your storage that you no longer need. The empty space will be used automatically to support your RAM, and make the whole system faster. First, let's learn how to check how much storage you have available.

How to Check Storage on Your iPad

  1. Open the Settings app on your iPad.

    why is my ipad so slow
     
  2. Tap General, then tap iPad Storage.

      how to reset ipad  
     
  3. Now you can see how much of your iPad's storage is in use, and what it's being used for.

    check ipad storage
     

You'll notice in the image above that there's an option called Offload Unused Apps. This is a great feature that saves documents and data while automatically offloading unused apps if storage is low. Unfortunately, this feature appeared for the first time with iOS 11, so if you have an older iPad that can't upload that operating system, you'll need to delete unused apps instead to save storage.

6. How to Delete Apps on iPad That You Don’t Use

If your iPad is running slowly, it's probably a RAM issue rather than a storage issue unless you've nearly maxed out the available gigabytes of storage. If your iPad's storage really is nearing maximum capacity, though, it can help to delete apps that you rarely or never use. Here's how to delete apps on your iPad.

  1. Open the Settings apptap General, then tap iPad Storage again.
  2. Now, tap on an app that you'd like to delete, then tap Delete App when the option appears.

    how to speed up ipad  

7. Stop Background App Refresh

While we're speaking of apps, let's talk about another way apps can slow down your iPad. Most of us probably open an app, use it for a bit, open another app, and so on; we may have several apps all open at once at any given time. This isn't a problem in itself, but if Background App Refresh is on, then your iPad is using RAM to refresh every one of your open apps. Here's how to choose whether you'd like to turn Background App Refresh on or off on an app-by-app basis.

  1. Open the Settings app, tap General, then tap Background App Refresh.

    my ipad is slow
     
  2. From here, you can choose to toggle off Background App Refresh for all apps, or go down the list of your apps and toggle off and on as you see fit.

    background app refresh on ipad

8. Move Photos & Videos to Storage

Photos can eat up a sizable chunk of your iPad's storage capacity; if you haven't already, now's the time to offload those pictures. If you have iOS 8 or later, which is compatible with every iPad except the original, you'll be able to use iCloud to save all your photos, so if anything should ever happen to your iPad, they'll be preserved. The problem with this solution is that if you delete photos from your iPad, they'll also be deleted from iCloud! To save your photos while also freeing up storage space on your iPad, your best bet would be uploading them to an external hard drive or computer not connected to your iCloud account, then deleting them from your iPad. Getting on a regular schedule of deleting photos from your iPad will help keep your device running more quickly, as well as making the task less daunting. 

9. Move Downloaded Music to Storage

Another storage hog that you may want to consider offloading to your external hard drive is any music from iTunes or Apple Music you've downloaded to your iPad. To check how much storage space is being used by your Music app:

  1. Open the Settings app.
  2. Tap on General.
  3. Tap iPad Storage.
  4. Scroll down and tap Music.

    how to clear ipad

You'll see how much storage is being used in the Documents & Data section; in my case, it's only 33 KB. 

10. Cache Cleaner: Delete Your Browser Cache, Cookies & Web History

Whichever your preferred internet browser is, it tracks and stores a lot of information about your internet usage, including recent searches, a history of web pages you've visited, a list of anything you've downloaded, requests from web pages, and much more. While this cache of data can prove convenient and improve load times, it can also eat up storage space. For this example, we'll clear Safari's browser cache, including website data and cookies in this example.

  1. Open the Settings app.

    why is my ipad so slow
     
  2. Tap Safari.

    ipad 2 slow
     
  3.  Tap Clear History and Website Data.

    speed up ipad
     

11. Change Your Graphics Settings

Let's get back to RAM for a minute; something you might not realize your iPad is using working memory for are graphics settings. These settings can be changed to save processing power and speed up your iPad; to accomplish this:

  1. Open the Settings app.
  2. Tap Accessibility.
  3. Tap Display & Text Size.
  4. Toggle on Reduce Transparency.

    toggle on reduce transparency
     
  5. Go back to Accessibility and tap Motion.
  6. Toggle on Reduce Motion and Prefer Cross-Fade Transitions

    speed up ipad
     

12. Turn Off Siri & Search

Something else you can try to free up some processing power is to turn off Siri & Search. Changing this setting will turn off Spotlight and Siri Search, which may prove to be inconvenient. The benefit, though, is that turning these features off will save the processing power it takes to index every item on your iPad. To turn off this feature:

  1. Open the Settings app.
  2. Tap Siri & Search.
  3. Here's where this gets a bit time consuming, but then again, having the ability to decide which of your apps you'd like Siri &Search turned on or off for will let you leave your most essential searches on while turning off those you really don't need indexed.
  4. If you want to disable Allow Notifications, Show in App Library & Spotlight, Show When Sharing, and Show When Listening, toggle all four off.

  5. Now, tap any app below Suggestions and toggle off Show in AppShow on Home Screen, and Suggest App, as well as Suggest Notifications.

13. How to Factory Reset Your iPad Settings

If none of the previous steps have helped your iPad to speed up, your last-ditch attempt should be a factory reset. Factory resetting your iPad will wipe all your settings while preserving the data and apps you've chosen to keep on your device. Once this is accomplished, you'll need to restore all your settings to the way you prefer them, which may take a bit of time! To restore your iPad to factory settings:

  1. Open the Settings app.
  2. Tap General.
  3. Tap Transfer or Reset iPad.

  4. Tap Reset

14. What to Do with an Old iPad: Apple Trade-In & Apple Recycle Program

If none of these tips on how to speed up an old iPad have helped, the time has come to consider replacing it. Take the steps needed to take to erase your personal information from your iPad before you sell or recycle it, as well as how to restore your data to your new iPad once you've purchased it. Before you get your new iPad, take some time to consider which iPad data plan is right for you. You can also check out the different iPad generations.

Apple has a program you should definitely check out, called Apple Trade-In. This free trade in and recycling program will give you an Apple Store gift card for the value of your old iPad, and recycle any components that can't be reused.

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How to Keep iPhone Screen On: Auto-Lock on iPhone & iPad (2022)

Learn how to turn off Sleep mode on iPhone and other fixes for when your iPhone screen turns off too fast.

This article will tell you how to stop your iPhone from going to sleep too quickly. If you want to change your Lock screen settings to turn off Auto-Lock or change how quickly your screen dims, we'll cover that as well. In addition to "why does my screen turn off so fast?" you may also be wondering, "why is Auto-Lock grayed out on my iPhone?" We'll tell you why this happens, and how to fix it.

Related: How to Write Notes Directly from the Lock Screen on Your iPhone

Related Video: Customize What You Can Access from Lock Screen

The above video is a preview of an iPhone Life Insider Daily Video Tip

Jump To:

What Is Auto-Lock on the iPhone & iPad?

What is Auto-Lock? Auto-Lock on an iPhone, or Sleep mode, dims the screen after a set amount of time in order to extend iPhone battery life and prevent others from accessing your unlocked iPhone. Auto-Lock activates a screen timeout after a set number of seconds or minutes unless you disable Auto-Lock. In the same way that your computer goes to sleep after a set amount of time, the iPhone, too, will dim the screen so that the battery life is conserved. If you disable Auto-Lock to get rid of your automatic screen lock time, it will cut into your battery life.

I’ve changed my iPad Auto-Lock time most often when cooking with a recipe as I need to easily be able to see the next step without covering my iPad in food. You can change Auto-Lock settings for tasks like this, and then easily change it back when you're done. However, you also have the option to turn off Auto-Lock altogether. If your iPhone keeps shutting off, use the tips below to change your iPhone or iPad's Auto-Lock time. To learn more great iPhone and iPad tips, check out our Tip of the Day newsletter.

Related: How to Find Your iPhone Even If It’s Dead 

How to Change Screen Lock Time on Your iPhone & iPad 

The most effective way to stop your iPhone from sleeping is to change your iPhone sleep timer. Auto-Lock is an easy feature to change in Settings. You select 30 seconds all the way to 5 minutes before your screen locks; you can also choose to set Auto-Lock to Never, essentially turning Auto-Lock off. Your iPhone's screen lock time is, by default, set to 30 seconds.  

How to Change Auto-Lock (Sleep Mode) on the iPhone & iPad 

  1. Open the Settings app.

  2. Tap Display & Brightness.

  3. Select Auto-Lock.

  4. Set the timer to the time that works best for you.

    auto lock settings

If you attempted to change your Auto-Lock time and suddenly panicked because it’s grayed out—take a deep breath and proceed to the tip after next. Don’t worry; it’s an easy fix.

How to Fix a Grayed-Out Auto-Lock on Your iPhone

Auto-Lock on your iPhone will be grayed out when Low Power Mode is on. Low Power Mode on the iPhone and iPad forces Auto-Lock to remain at thirty seconds to conserve battery life. To stop Auto-Lock from being grayed out, all you need to do is turn Low Power Mode off. If you follow our tip for how to turn on Hey Siri, you can activate Siri and say, “Turn off Low Power Mode.” Or, you can use the tip below to manually turn Low Power Mode off. Once you’ve turned Low Power Mode off, navigate back to the Auto-Lock setting, and you’ll be able to change it to whatever time you prefer.

To fix grayed out Auto-Lock setting and stop your iPhone or iPad from sleeping when you don't want it to:

  1. You can say, "Hey, Siri, turn off Low Power Mode”.

    hey siri turn off low power mode
  2. Alternately, open the Settings app.

  3. Tap Battery.

  4. Toggle off Low Power Mode.

    turn off low power mode
     

Now you can navigate back to Auto-Lock in Display & Brightness and change the Auto-Lock time. If interested, you can also learn this nifty shortcut to switch between your open apps on your iPhone. 

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How to Buy Kindle Books on iPhone & iPad (2022 Update)

Wondering how to buy books on Kindle app for iPhone? You can’t. Learn how to purchase Kindle books on iPad and iPhone using Safari instead!

Can you read Kindle books on iPad or iPhone? Yes. But how to buy Kindle books on iPhone and iPad is less straightforward. Because Amazon doesn’t want to pay Apple a cut of any in-app purchases, you can’t buy books in the Kindle app for iPhone or in the Amazon app. We’ll show you how to purchase Kindle books on iPhone by using Safari or another web browser to visit Amazon.com instead.

Related: How to Share Kindle Books with Your Friends and Family When You Don’t Have Amazon Prime

Jump To:

How to Buy Kindle Book on iPhone & iPad

There are no instructions for how to buy books on Kindle app on iPhone because Amazon doesn’t allow in-app book purchases. However, you can purchase Kindle books on iPhone and iPad using the trick below:

  1. Open the Safari app.

    Open the Safari app - can t buy kindle book on amazon app
     
  2. Navigate to Amazon.com.

    Navigate to Amazon.com - how do i purchase a kindle book
     
  3. Make sure NOT TO TAP any prompts to open the Amazon app.

    Make sure NOT TO TAP any prompts to open the Amazon app.
     
  4. Sign in to your Amazon account if you're not already logged in.

    Sign in to your Amazon account if you're not already logged in.
     
  5. Tap the menu bar at the top of the screen.

    Tap the triple bar at the top of the screen.
     
  6. Tap Kindle eBooks.

    Tap Kindle eBooks - how to download books on iphone
     
  7. Search for and select the Kindle e-book that you want to purchase.

    Search for and select the Kindle e-book that you want to purchase.
     
  8. Tap Buy now with 1-Click.

    Tap Buy now with 1-Click.
     
  9. And it’s bought! It will automatically appear in your Amazon Kindle and Kindle Reader libraries. On your Kindle or in your Kindle app on iPhone or iPad, tap the book you bought to download it to your device.

    And it’s bought! It will automatically appear in your Amazon Kindle and Kindle Reader libraries.

Pro Tip: Any time you use a website for an app you have, your iPhone or iPad will keep prompting you to use the app instead. If you accidentally navigate to Amazon or Kindle app and try to purchase the book, you will see the message, "This app does not support purchasing of this content. Digital books and comics purchased from Amazon are available to read in the Kindle app." If this happens, just navigate back to Safari. Also, if you have trouble downloading a book due to storage limits, you can also learn how to manage your iCloud storage.

Return to top

Create a Shortcut to the Kindle Store for Your Home Screen

I get tired of having to buy Kindle e-books by navigating to the Amazon site through Safari. If you want to find an easy way to buy Kindle books on your iPad or iPhone, there's a shortcut. To learn more iPhone tricks, sign up for our free Tip of the Day newsletter.

  1. Open the Safari app.

    Open the Safari app - can t buy kindle book on amazon app
     
  2. Navigate to Amazon.com.

    Navigate to Amazon.com - how do i purchase a kindle book
     
  3. Make sure NOT TO TAP any prompts to open the Amazon app.

    Make sure NOT TO TAP any prompts to open the Amazon app.
     
  4. Sign in to your Amazon account if you're not already logged in.

    Sign in to your Amazon account if you're not already logged in.
     
  5. Tap the menu icon at the top of the screen.

    Tap the triple bar at the top of the screen.
     
  6. Tap Kindle eBooks.

    Tap Kindle eBooks - how to download books on iphone
     
  7. Tap the Share icon at the bottom center of your screen.

    Tap the Share icon at the bottom center of your screen.
     
  8. Scroll down until you find Add to Home Screen and tap it. You may need to tap More for this option to appear.

    Tap the Share icon at the bottom center of your screen.
     
  9. You can rename the icon by tapping the title. I like mine to be called Buy eBooks.

    You can rename the icon by tapping the title. I like mine to be called Buy eBooks.
     
  10. Tap Add to create an icon for the Kindle store to your Home screen.

    Tap Add to create an icon for the Kindle store to your Home screen.
     
  11. From now on, you can easily access the Kindle Store by tapping the icon on your iPhone or iPad and buy all the e-books you want.

    From now on, you can easily access the Kindle Store by tapping the icon on your iPhone or iPad and buy all the e-books you want.

Even if you tap this shortcut, your Apple device will still prompt you to open the Amazon app. If you accidentally do this, you will have to return to your Home screen and tap the shortcut or follow the steps to open it in Safari again.

Return to top

Why Can't I Buy Kindle Books on Amazon App?

Apple collects a percentage of the money spent on digital purchases within the apps on its devices; and when you buy Kindle books on iPhone or iPad using Safari or another web browser, 100 percent of the money goes to Amazon. 

So the answer to the questions, why can't I buy books on Kindle app and why can't I buy Kindle books on Amazon app is, Amazon doesn't want to pay. 

This battle over in-app purchase commissions is why you can't buy a Kindle book after the sample and why you can't buy a Kindle book in the Amazon app on iPhone or iPad. It's also why it's only possible to buy and download Kindle books on your iPhone or iPad or access the Kindle store from your iPhone using a web browser and not the app.

Luckily, the workaround we taught you will make it possible for you to buy new books hassle-free!

Return to top

Now get to reading! If you plan to buy more Kindle books on your iPhone or iPad in the future, I highly recommend that you create a shortcut to the Amazon store from your iPhone or iPad Home Screen. Next, learn how to delete books from your Kindle app. If you're trying to read books and find your iPad is lagging, check out these handy tips to uncover why your iPad is so slow. If you're still stuck deciding whether a Kindle or iPad is right for your e-reading needs, check out our Kindle vs. iPad article.

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How to Turn the iPad Floating Keyboard On & Off (iPadOS 15)

For easier typing, switch between the small floating keyboard on iPad and your normal keyboard.

The iPad floating keyboard can be handy when you want to see more of the screen or use slide-to-type. However, it can be annoying when the floating keyboard pops out accidentally, especially if you don’t know how to return it to the bottom of the screen. Let's cover how to enable and disable the floating keyboard on your iPad. 

Related: How to Get Rid of Split Screen on iPad (iOS 15 Update)

How to Turn On the iPad Floating Keyboard

The small Apple floating keyboard can come in handy for quick typing and better viewing on your screen, so it's nice to know how to turn it on when you want it. If you haven't already, update your iPad software to the latest iPad OS, then follow the steps below. If you're a big fan of the iPad and are torn between purchasing the new iPad Air or the iPad Pro, read through our article that hashes out the details to help you better decide. 

  1. Open any app that uses the keyboard, such as the Notes app.

  2. Tap and hold the keyboard icon in the bottom right corner of the keyboard.

  3. A menu will appear. Keep holding your finger on the screen and drag your finger to select the Floating keyboard option.

  4. You can move the floating keyboard around the screen by touching and dragging the grab bar at the bottom.

How to Get Rid of Floating Keyboard on iPad

You're not alone if you're wondering, how do I get my keyboard back to normal? Even if you accidentally turned on the floating keyboard, this quick trick will turn your iPad's small keyboard back to the full-size version! Here's how to turn off the floating keyboard:

  1. To switch back to the regular keyboard, grab the bar at the bottom of the floating keyboard and drag it to the bottom center of your screen.

  2. Another method is to perform a reverse pinch gesture from the center of the iPad floating keyboard. Your fingers should start close together and then spread farther apart, maintaining contact with the iPad screen the whole time.

Voilà! Your keyboard is back to normal. Now you can enable or disable the iPad floating keyboard anytime you want. Happy typing!

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How to Create Email Folders on iPhone & iPad (iOS 15 & iPadOS 15)

For easier organization, learn how to add a folder in Mail on iPhone or iPad.

This article will show you how to add a folder on iPhone email. Creating a new email folder on an iPhone or iPad is quick and easy, and it can really upgrade your email organization. Let's learn how to how to create a folder in email on an iPad or iPhone.

Related: How to Find Hidden Apps on iPhone 

Why You'll Love This Tip

  • Declutter your inbox and keep your emails organized.
  • Conveniently create email folders directly on your iPhone or iPad.

How to Add a Folder on iPhone Email or iPad Email

In the steps below, we'll show you how to create a folder on iPad or iPhone in the Mail app. To learn more email tips and tricks, check out our Tip of the Day newsletter. Read through this article if you want to learn how to save photos from the Mail app, as well as how to save multiple photos at once. But, to add a folder in Mail on iPhone or iPad:

  1. Open the Mail app.


     
  2. From your inbox, tap Back or Mailboxes (whichever option you see in the top-left corner). If your Mail app opens into an email, navigate back to your inbox first.


     
  3. Tap Edit.


     
  4. Select New Mailbox.


     
  5. Enter a name for your new email folder.


     
  6. Tap the blank cell under Mailbox Location.


     
  7. From here, select the mailbox or folder where your new folder is to be stored. 


     
  8. Tap Save.


     
  9. Tap Done.​​

Congratulations! You've created your first custom folder in the Mail app.

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