Review: Prevent Frayed Cables with ChargeGuardZ

Some of the most interesting items I've found at shows like the CES have no electronics component to them. At CES 2018, I saw one such item. The ChargeGuardZ ($9.99) is a clever gadget that routes a cable, such as a Lightning cable or headphone cable, in such a way that prevents fraying of the ends. In the case of earbuds, you can also wrap the wire around the outside of the ChargeGuardZ to prevent it from getting tangled.

Related: Review: The 3 Most Durable Lightning Cable Options from Nomad

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ChargeGuardZ

The ChargeGuardZ also helps keep your cables in place, its heft can make sure your cable stays on your nightstand or desk. You might want to get several, so it's nice to know they are available in five colors with volume discounts available. 

Pros

  • Protect your cables
  • Helps keep cables in place
  • Available in five colors
  • Volume discounts

Cons

  • Might require an explanation for its usefulness to be apparent

Final Verdict

The ChargeGuardZ, like any new innovation, might need a bit of an explanation as to how and why you need one... but you do.

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Todd Bernhard is a bestselling (6+ million downloads) award-winning (AARP, About.com, BestAppEver.com, Digital Hollywood, and Verizon) developer and founder of NoTie.NET, an app developer specializing in Talking Ringtone apps including AutoRingtone. And his profile photo is of the last known sighting of Mr. Bernhard wearing a tie, circa 2007!

An iPhone is almost always attached to his hip or in his pocket, but over the years, Mr. Bernhard has owned an Apple Newton, a Motorola Marco, an HP 95LX, a Compaq iPaq, a Palm Treo, and a Nokia e62. In addition to writing for iPhone Life, Mr. Bernhard has written for its sister publications, PocketPC Magazine and The HP Palmtop Paper.