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CloudOn

Document Editing Shootout Part 2: Documents to Go vs. Free Google QuickOffice!

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I have used Microsoft Office desktop programs along side many alternatives over the years. I have benefited hugely from the various mobile editors out there, and am always on the lookout for new or updated options. The oldest example of this is the mobile editing suite called Documents to Go from Data Viz ($9.99). I use MS Office more than anything else, but often do minor edits on the go, and since I was evaluating a new DTG version, I figured it couldn't hurt to do another shootout. This time Documents to Go will go head to head with newly acquired and rebranded Google QuickOffice (Free). Both are good editing options, but read on to see who will emerge the victor! I'll also roundup some other editing apps you may not have been aware of....



iPad Productivity Suites For Mobile Workplace

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Walt Mossberg, who writes about technology for the Wall Street Journal, posted a helpful review of iPad productivity suites last week on All Things D. People are increasingly leaving their laptops at home these days when they travel and are using an iPad instead. But that typically entails having some relatively robust software to play the role of those familiar desktop applications: Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. No app is going to have all the features of the desktop applications, but most are good at opening and editing files created using these software programs. 

In addition to compatibility with Microsoft's offerings, a key issue is file management. On your desktop computer, you organize your files by putting them in folders and access them in these locations. But iOS doesn't have this sort of filing system. So how do you transfer files back and forth between your desktop computer and iPad, and keep the files in sync? The cloud, of course. 



Cloud Shootout 2 - More apps and services reviewed!

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This review started out about Download Expert--a simple iOS browser app that let's you grab files from a web site or online service like Dropbox. You want your music, movies, and other files on your iPhone, install Download Expert...blah, blah. Then I started messing with the Dropbox app to troubleshoot some issues, and next thing I know, I'm trying a completely new service called OfficeDrop that has it's own awesome iOS app and web service for syncing files. Sheesh! Round and round on the cloud wheel we go (see my previous shootout here). Though the shootout was more about document editing, I covered a few cloud storage services there. You can learn more about these services and apps in this, yet another cloud storage review, and pseudo-shootout...Part 2, you might say...



Doc Editing Shootout - CloudOn versus Documents Free!!

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Cloud document services are becoming the defacto standard for creating and editing documents. The advent and rise of iPad is encroaching heavily into computing realms that were previously a firm domain of the PC. Gone are the days when you wrung your hands over a Word file marooned on your home computer. In this review, I compare two popular iPad cloud editors; one free and one free-with-ads. CloudOn is an excellent and completely free app that is as good as any editing suite I have used, being MS Office based. Documents Free is a capable editing alternative with fewer features. Both of these apps will allow you to connect to popular cloud storage services, access and upload your important docs. Who will be the last editor standing?... Read on to find out!



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