iPhone Life magazine

Nate Adcock's picture

Nate Adcock is a system and integration engineer with experience managing and administering a variety of computing environments. He has worked extensively with mobile gadgets of all shapes and sizes for many years. He is also a former military weather forecaster. Nate is a regular contributor for the iphonelife.com and smartphonemag.com blogs and helps manage both websites. Read more from Nate at natestera.drupalgardens.com or e-mail him at nate@iphonelife.com.

iHome iB75 Bluetooth Earphones will Make a Great Audio Gift!

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You probably already knew that iHome has cool audio gear to accessorize your smartphone or mobile computing platform of choice. I had been eagerly awaiting the iB75 since getting a brief demo at CES last January, having scoured the earth for a good pair of active-wear Bluetooth headphones. In this review, I'll go over why the iB75s will make a great stocking stuffer for that on-the-go person on your list.



What I Played this Week - Gobble Edition!

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Three cool titles helped me to overcome a triptophan and carb coma this past week. One of them was an actual zombie-style turkey shoot called Gunner Z (free with many IAPs). The second was a free tunnel race called Boost 2 ($1.99). Finally a platform defense hybrid called Forces of Nature ($0.99). All three made for a delicious gobble weekend of time killing fun!



Give IK Multimedia Gear to Your Musicians This Holiday Season!

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Several of us blogger musician types have raved about IK Multimedia gear over the years, and with good reason (see Mike Riley's recent reviews here.) Early this year at CES, I was able to get an up close and personal preview of the latest music creation gadgets, but only recently was able to check out the production versions of IK's iRig Pro and Blueboard. If you are wondering what in the world to get your favorite musician this holiday (with a Mac, iPad, or iPhone), look no further. You can check out the rocking guitar demo above for a taste!



Toymail Kickstarter needs your help to bring messaging and fun to little ones!

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Toymail is a cute, child-safe toy that can send and receive wireless audio messages. There is a ton of coolness about this idea. Imagine tucking the kids into bed from anywhere in the world, or enjoying an impromptu playtime while taking a break at work. 



Rich Dad Poor Dad - Financial Advice in a Well-Executed App!

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Self improvement and self help apps/books are legion in the app store. Typically an array of boiled-down quotes or ideas (from some guru's book) arranged in course-like tabulated views. Boring squared is usually my first impression. In contrast, the Rich Dad Poor Dad app powered by Clutch brings fresh presentation and snappy interface features to the old self-help saw...



Machines at War 3 - New version brings More Intense Battlefield Strategy to iOS!

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Before there was Xbox and PlayStation, and way back before even Nintendo and Atari 2600 (think waaay back), there was a world domination strategy game (played with tiny plastic pieces on a flat game-board) that was so earth shatteringly cool that it defied description. No computer screen rendering was required to imagine the massing of superior firepower to encircle and destroy your enemies. That game was the legendary game of Risk (still sold by Hasbro today), and it was nothing less than epic (if you actually had friends to play it with). If one could have imagined the real combat coordination and visualization that was missing from Risk, I believe Machines at War 3 ($6.99) would not have been far off the mark!



400 Smackers and Up for a New iPad mini with Retina? Is it worth it?

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You have to go check out this quick review over at CNET announcing (with a brief hands on) the new iPad mini. What amounts to a near-flame war erupts between anti and pro Apple fans in the comments section below (quite humorous as most flames quickly become.) The arguments against the new tablet mostly go something along the line of why Apple lovers would pay so much more (than for a Kindle Fire or Nexus 7, for example). I will attempt to explain my upgrade logic in this post. If you are considering a new lightweight, small. and snappy tablet this holiday season, I would definitely give the new iPad mini with Retina a long and hard look...



SteelSeries Flux: In-ear Pro Headset Review

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In-ear headphones are not my favorite, but the SteelSeries Flux In-Ear Pro Headset ($49.99/$129.99) has a tangle resistant, top-of-ear design that works better than most others I have tried. Once you get these lightweight earphones situated comfortably, they will fill your head with an immersive, full-bodied sound that many in-ear headphones just can't muster. However, the trick really is getting them to seat in your ear properly. Good thing plenty of tip options are provided in the kit.



Type:Rider Game Review

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I guess after you play or review a few high-caliber 3D action games—particularly ones with fast, stunning graphics and sound—you sort of become numb to similarly fantastic, over-the-top games. You overdose on them, or at least I do. You need to cleanse the palette, as it were. Eventually along will come a simple game, completely out of nowhere. No fancy 3D engine, shaders, or blazing polygon models. Just clever use of lighting, and in-game ambience that is so darn good, it is like discovering the wonder of your iPad for the first time. Type:Rider ($2.99) is exactly that kind of game.



E-Book Price Fixing: What, if Anything, did Apple do Wrong?

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Apple recently filed an appeal over a federal court ruling that condemned the software giant for colluding with publishers to fix prices of eBooks sold through the iBooks web store. The ruling decrees monitoring of future practices and a breaking of those contracts with publishers that include price point agreements. The company is denying any wrongdoing in the case, steadfastly driving forward on an appeal that several experts have stated will be hard to win. It is also somewhat brow raising that publishers have already agreed to take their medicine and put the nasty business behind them by settling their cases. Apple CEO Tim Cook described the case as "bizarre," and e-mails sent by Steve Jobs were even dredged up during the case proceedings. What, if anything, did Apple do wrong? Read on to hear my ruling in the case...



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