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Development

Infographic (via GigaOM): The App Store Economy

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GigaOm reports:

The data used was given to us on an exclusive basis from analytics firm Flurry. Indeed, three-quarters of the apps in the App Store are “paid apps,” which was used to calculate the average app price and the subsequent revenue figures in the previous version. However, only one-quarter of the apps actually downloaded are “paid apps,” so the average price per transaction (paid + free downloads) is actually much lower than the average app price in the store. 



Use MobileAppLoader.com to Build Your iPhone App

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I recently had the chance to chat with Zvika Ashkenazi, the CEO of MobileAppLoader.com and I was able to learn some very interesting things about his company, the services it provides and I also learned how to track App Store sales.

Zvika sent me a graphic detailing January 2010 metrics for DIY iPhone apps. According to the graphic, MobileAppLoader was responsible for creating 436 apps for their customers which include realtors, auto dealers, restaurants, and hotels to name just a few categories.

As you know from my previous posts here, a number of companies have launched in the last year or so to help people and businesses create their own applications, not just for iPhones, but also for other platforms like Android and Windows Mobile. Previously, this sort of service was unheard of. If one wanted software developed, it could get pretty pricey. For large corporations, this was considered 'the cost of business', but for individuals and smaller companies, personalized or customized software was often out of reach.

Now, some people themselves are talented programmers themselves and can make their own apps. Some companies have developers on staff, while some companies can afford to hire an outside developer for a specific project  - at a cost of $5,000 to $25,000 - to develop an application from scratch, that kind of budget is out of the reach for many people. Of course, one can get it for less, but even so, a ball-park bargain-basement sort of figure is still around $2,500. And most aren't looking to create super-sophisticated software, and don't really need to consider spending that sort of money anyway.

At the present time, MobileAppLoader claims that they are the #1 Do-It-Yourself iPhone App company. These stats do not include companies which build apps from RSS feeds or companies with less than 30 apps. Zvika explained that he generated this information by typing the name of the developer into iTunes. Now that I know how to do this, I anticipate hours of fun

Since MobileAppLoader doesn't build their apps via RSS feeds, I was curious as to their process. It's done by what Zvika described as a unique "App in a Snap" Wizard. A user signs up for an account on their site, and selects their business category. Then they chose a design from Iron, Bronze, Silver and Gold offerings and upload four images and type in certain details (contact info, URLs, feeds, text, etc...) and finally hits 'submit'. Behind the scenes, the content is then converted to a native iPhone app using objective-C using the Apple X-code development tool, and that process is then followed by a a quick quality assurance to make sure everything is working properly before the app is sent to Apple for review.

Apps built from RSS feeds can be very handy, but MobileAppLoader is very proud of the real-time interactivity of the apps they build using this method. For example, they've built a number of apps for towing companies and the apps include the ability to tell the towing company where you've broken down, show them a picture of your car and ask them to come and get you. So the app makes use of notifications, GPS and the camera. And that's just one example. Auto dealer apps include the ability of the dealer to notify a customer of their next service appointment. Prices start at $59.99 for setup and $4.99 a month.

 



Hey iPad, Meet The Newton

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A long, long time ago, a man named Steve Jobs created a company named Apple Computers. Apple eventually fired Steve. Apple then created The Newton. Then Steve took over Apple again. Steve killed the Newton. Fast forward in time, now Steve creates, iPad.



How will the iPad and iPhone OS 3.2 Change App Development?

Has Apple changed the world again with the release of the iPad? To app developers, the change is both subtle and enormous. It’s subtle because the new OS version 3.2 is only a minor update from the previous version 3.1.2, and because there are few changes in the APIs(just some additions). On the other hand, this is an enormous change because the iPad presents an entirely new market for both existing and new applications. It is likely to spark another “app gold rush” similar to what we saw when the App Store opened and the iPhone SDK was first released two years ago. It also significantly changes the development paradigm for programmers of iPhone apps.


AppMakr - Democratizing iPhone Application Development

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High-end iPhone and Android application developer PointAbout's client list includes companies like The Washington Post, Cars.com, Kaplan, Kohls, Qorvis, Burger King and The National Guard and a large number of other deep pocket companies and organizations.


Why Christmas is the best day to sell iPhone Apps

Nick Campbell of ShakeItPhoto fame noted:

So, I updated my AppViz software when I got home today and surprisingly, I saw a big bump in my ShakeItPhoto sales on Christmas day. This got me thinking about what would cause such a spike. What would cause my sales to practically double going into Christmas?

And here's the video he made on the subject: 



GetAppsDone.com - A Meeting Place for Developers & Those Looking to Get iPhone Development Done

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Get AppsDone.com is a new site which hosts "a no-frills job board where companies looking to get apps done and iPhone developers can easily connect with each other." Check out their blog, and of course, they have an iPhone app of their own. 

 



KnockingLive video streaming App Approved After Appeal to Steve Jobs

Ars Technica reported that Pointy Heads Software wrote a persuasive email to Steve Jobs to get their Knocking Live Video app approved and into the AppStore: 

The impassioned pleas of one developer, e-mailed to Steve Jobs, resulted in a quick reversal of an app's rejection. The launch of the app today is the first known approved app that can stream live video directly from one iPhone to another, and the first approval for an app with known use of private APIs. Apple's change of heart came "directly from the top," and is a sign that real change in the App Store approval process is in the works.



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