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Development

Adobe pulls the plug on iPhone, ceases all Flash and AIR development (via Download Squad)

Over on DownloadSquad.com, Sebastian Anthony has posted some very interesting news:

It seems the camel's back has finally snapped: Adobe's Flash department has curtailed all Flash and AIR development for the iPhone OS platform. Citing the recent change in Apple's developer license, Adobe no longer believes the iPad or iPhone to be a safe or worthwhile investment. The ability to target iPhone and iPad in Flash CS5 will still exist, but no further work will be made by Adobe to update or support that feature.



Daring Fireball: New iPhone Developer Agreement Bans the Use of Adobe’s Flash-to-iPhone Compiler

 Once again this afternoon, a tweet has alerted me to some developer news. 

In the new version of the iPhone Developer Program License Agreement released by Apple today (and which developers must agree to before downloading the 4.0 SDK beta), section 3.3.1 now reads:



iPhone SDK 4 Betas for iPhone and iPod Touch, but NOT iPad

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A tweet from iLounge alerted me to this interesting news:



Cory Doctorow and the Electronic Frontier Foundation on Apple's iPhone Developer Agreement

 

People who want to develop for the iPhone OS family of devices (iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad) and sell their software through the AppStore must agree to Apple's terms. 



App Store gets Adult Supervision... too heavy handed?

"Apple has reversed their policy".  If I've heard it once, I've heard it a million times.  Actually, I google'd those words and found 994,000 results, so that's not an exaggeration!  Apple has had enough of the 'bikini' apps and has begun removing such apps from the App Store.

 

I must admit, I am a bit conflicted here.  As a father, it can be frustrating seeing 17+ apps when doing searches or browsing the App Store.  Those apps obviously sell, but that pushes other apps down in the rankings, making it harder to sell.  As a developer of family-friendly apps, this is also frustrating because it means less "exposure" (pun intended) for my apps!

 



New AppStore Rules? No More Overtly Sexual Content?

According to an article on TechCrunch (also see this additional TC post) which I learned about from a post on HolyKaw, Apple has or is about to change the rules about sexual content in Apps. Apparently it's now "No Swimsuits, No Skin, And No Innuendo". While the TC article is sympathetic to developers who make 'sexy apps', I'm not. I'm not a prude, but I am very tired of the smutty crap that seems to pass muster when it comes to apps and themes on a variety of platforms. 



At Macworld: Yapper- Create Your Own Apps

Today I got to speak with Chirantan (Chintu) Parikh, CEO ( or Yapper Chief as he calls himself) of SachManya LLC. His company has developed a way that allows you to create your own mobile apps for your company or website.  Simply by going to their site, you follow 4 steps, fill in your information, and your app is done. 



Funding for Developers: The AppFund for the iPad

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 On the heels of the iPad's launch comes the AppFund:

AppFund is a seed fund focused on the development of Applications for Tablet devices such as the Apple iPad. We are looking for Apps that capitalize on the dynamic and mobile nature of the iPad and similar Tablet devices. 
 
We believe that the iPad is a transformative device that is going to have wide ranging uses and applications in enterprise environments, entertainment, content, social networking, games and small business.
 
The fund will provide as little as $5k to get an idea started to up to $500k for full scale development, marketing, and deployment.
Additional details: who we are and what we're looking for.
 
 


Infographic (via GigaOM): The App Store Economy

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GigaOm reports:

The data used was given to us on an exclusive basis from analytics firm Flurry. Indeed, three-quarters of the apps in the App Store are “paid apps,” which was used to calculate the average app price and the subsequent revenue figures in the previous version. However, only one-quarter of the apps actually downloaded are “paid apps,” so the average price per transaction (paid + free downloads) is actually much lower than the average app price in the store. 



Use MobileAppLoader.com to Build Your iPhone App

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I recently had the chance to chat with Zvika Ashkenazi, the CEO of MobileAppLoader.com and I was able to learn some very interesting things about his company, the services it provides and I also learned how to track App Store sales.

Zvika sent me a graphic detailing January 2010 metrics for DIY iPhone apps. According to the graphic, MobileAppLoader was responsible for creating 436 apps for their customers which include realtors, auto dealers, restaurants, and hotels to name just a few categories.

As you know from my previous posts here, a number of companies have launched in the last year or so to help people and businesses create their own applications, not just for iPhones, but also for other platforms like Android and Windows Mobile. Previously, this sort of service was unheard of. If one wanted software developed, it could get pretty pricey. For large corporations, this was considered 'the cost of business', but for individuals and smaller companies, personalized or customized software was often out of reach.

Now, some people themselves are talented programmers themselves and can make their own apps. Some companies have developers on staff, while some companies can afford to hire an outside developer for a specific project  - at a cost of $5,000 to $25,000 - to develop an application from scratch, that kind of budget is out of the reach for many people. Of course, one can get it for less, but even so, a ball-park bargain-basement sort of figure is still around $2,500. And most aren't looking to create super-sophisticated software, and don't really need to consider spending that sort of money anyway.

At the present time, MobileAppLoader claims that they are the #1 Do-It-Yourself iPhone App company. These stats do not include companies which build apps from RSS feeds or companies with less than 30 apps. Zvika explained that he generated this information by typing the name of the developer into iTunes. Now that I know how to do this, I anticipate hours of fun

Since MobileAppLoader doesn't build their apps via RSS feeds, I was curious as to their process. It's done by what Zvika described as a unique "App in a Snap" Wizard. A user signs up for an account on their site, and selects their business category. Then they chose a design from Iron, Bronze, Silver and Gold offerings and upload four images and type in certain details (contact info, URLs, feeds, text, etc...) and finally hits 'submit'. Behind the scenes, the content is then converted to a native iPhone app using objective-C using the Apple X-code development tool, and that process is then followed by a a quick quality assurance to make sure everything is working properly before the app is sent to Apple for review.

Apps built from RSS feeds can be very handy, but MobileAppLoader is very proud of the real-time interactivity of the apps they build using this method. For example, they've built a number of apps for towing companies and the apps include the ability to tell the towing company where you've broken down, show them a picture of your car and ask them to come and get you. So the app makes use of notifications, GPS and the camera. And that's just one example. Auto dealer apps include the ability of the dealer to notify a customer of their next service appointment. Prices start at $59.99 for setup and $4.99 a month.

 



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