iPhone Life magazine

Bluetooth Headsets

iPhone OS 3.1.2 A2DP / AVRCP (stereo Bluetooth) iPhone 3G / 3GS test results

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You may well remember that, immediately after the release of OS 3.0 and the 3G S, I’ve published quite a few tests on stereo Bluetooth (A2DP) headphones compatibility with both the iPhone 3G and the 3G S (see THIS for my latest report).

Now that version 3.1.2 is out and I had some time to research how it can be safely jailbroken, I’ve re-run the tests, particularly in order to find out how voice control over Bluetooth works.



Anyone on AT&T with iPhone 3G, stereo BT headphones and another A2DP phone (or a 3GS)?

AT&T may have royally messed up the Bluetooth A2DP support in their firmware - after all, they've removed BT tethering; during this, they may have also (without their knowing about it – after all, evaluating A2DP quality needs some practice, which they may not have at all) messed up A2DP in some way.



WARNING: major stereo Bluetooth (A2DP) problems! Think twice and TEST a lot before buying any headphones for your iPhone 3G

UPDATE (06/26/2009): In the meantime, another, major problem has been found out: the encoding lag. See the just-added UPDATE section in the original article.
 

Originally written: Unfortunately, there are two major problems with the stereo Bluetooth (A2DP) support of iPhone OS 3.

1.) Many of you have already posted the previous/next remote controls not working. This, unfortunately, is a fundamental problem with the AVRCP implementation of OS3. Hope they’ll fix it in a next update.

2.) I’ve found a very hard-to-track and really annoying problem.



A full compliance & test report of stereo Bluetooth sound (A2DP) in iPhone OS 3

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I’ve finished (thoroughly) testing my six A2DP headphones with the new Bluetooth stereo support of iPhone OS 3.0 (OS3 for short), along with their traditional mobile phone headset functionality.


(the stereo headphones, all paired with my iPhone)


(in-call view: as can be seen, you can dynamically switch from the Bluetooth headset to the iPhone.



Unpair one headset before pairing another

You can only pair your iPhone with one Bluetooth accessory at a time. If you’ve paired your iPhone with one accessory and want to pair it with something else, you have to unpair it first. Here's how:

  1. From the Home screen, go to Settings >General >Bluetooth
  2. Make sure Bluetooth is turned on.
  3. Select the paired accessory from the list
  4. Tap on Unpair.

Pair with a third-party Bluetooth headset or car kit

Make the accessory “discoverable” or set it up to “search” for other Bluetooth devices. (Consult the instructions to do this.)

  1. Go to your iPhone’s Home screen and select Settings >General >Bluetooth and turn Bluetooth on. Your iPhone will search for nearby Bluetooth devices and list any that it finds, including your headset or car kit. (Note: If it’s not listed, go back to the previous step and be sure you made it discoverable.)
  2. Tap on the name of your headset or car kit in the list and you will be asked to enter a passkey. You get this from the instructions that came with the accessory.

Autopair Apple’s iPhone Bluetooth Headset

Apple’s iPhone Bluetooth Headset ($129: apple.com/apple) automatically pairs with your iPhone when you place it and the iPhone in a “Dual Dock” that comes with the headset.

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