iPhone Life magazine

Music

Slacker streaming radio — Slacker Pro giveaway

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Slacker is a service that, like Pandora, lets you identify the type of music you like and then creates a personalized station that streams this music. And Slacker, like Pandora, makes it super easy for you to create your station, beginning simply by naming your favorite song or artist. These two websites are hugely popular, and both offer a free iPhone app that lets you access your stations or create new ones.



Last FM: Version 2.0.0

LastFM Radio AppLast FM works very similar to Pandora Radio by allowing you to create a custom radio station based on the music style of your favorite band. When you start the app you are given the option of creating your own custom library or going with Last FM’s recommendations. To create a custom library you have to sign up for a free account on their Web site.

Pandora Radio: Version 2.0

PandoraProbably the most popular free radio application on the App Store, Pandora allows you to create personalized radio stations based on your favorite musical group or genre.

AOL Radio: Version 1.2.1.16

AOL RadioAOL Radio was one of the original Internet radio apps offered at the launch of the App Store. AOL Radio leverages the iPhone’s “Core Location” framework to detect a user’s location and automatically display broadcast radio stations nearest to the user. AOL Radio LocalesIt’s the only Internet radio app that does this, but I find this feature annoying because every time I launch the app, it shows me the same two country stations, both of which are not really near to where I live and commute. Still, the app is easy to use, offers every music type as well as live talk radio and news and always resumed on the station where I left it. AOL Radio’s interface is similar to the iPod menu structure, making it easy for new users to find radio stations, add them to your favorites menu, check the recent station list to see where you last left off, and more. You can use AOL Radio without creating an online account. Audio quality was good and buffering times were very fast. The program pauses when you receive a phone call and launches again when the call ends. When the call ends, you must navigate to the station to start the music again.


AOL Radio’s user interface (left) is similar to the iPod UI. The app uses the iPhone’s ability to
detect the user’s location to display a list of nearby broadcast radio stations (right).

A Musician's Best Friend

More than just for playing tunes

I’m not only a musician and teacher; I’ve been a PDA enthusiast for many years. It all started in the mid 90s, when I got my first handheld, Apple’s short-lived Newton. I moved on to the Palm Pilot and a great piece of software called ittyMIDI, which allowed me to play back MIDI files, change tempo, set volume levels, and mute individual tracks. When my Palm Pilot died, I moved on to a Windows Mobile Pocket PC, which had more multimedia capabilities and a variety of third-party programs that turned the Pocket PC into a musician’s helper.


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Best Ocarina performers compete for $10,000 in prizes

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When I first heard of Ocarina, I thought it was novel — using the iPhone as a wind instrument — but I didn't imagine it would catch on. It is, after all, a time-consuming affair to learn to play a new musical instrument. But it's become a top-selling application.



The iPhone as a musical wind instrument?

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What will they think of next? You gotta watch this short video and this of an iPhone being played like a flute, or rather a recorder. Apparently Ocarina creates sound by letting you blow across the iPhone.



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