iPhone Life magazine

SugarSync

16GB, 32GB, 64GB… Why Storage Capacity No Longer Matters

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The newest iPhones (5s and 5c) are available in 16GB, 32GB and 64GB versions. The iPad Air and the iPad Mini with Retina are available in 16GB, 32GB, 64GB, and 128GB.  

But the question is:

How much storage do you REALLY need?



Cloud Shootout 2 - More apps and services reviewed!

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This review started out about Download Expert--a simple iOS browser app that let's you grab files from a web site or online service like Dropbox. You want your music, movies, and other files on your iPhone, install Download Expert...blah, blah. Then I started messing with the Dropbox app to troubleshoot some issues, and next thing I know, I'm trying a completely new service called OfficeDrop that has it's own awesome iOS app and web service for syncing files. Sheesh! Round and round on the cloud wheel we go (see my previous shootout here). Though the shootout was more about document editing, I covered a few cloud storage services there. You can learn more about these services and apps in this, yet another cloud storage review, and pseudo-shootout...Part 2, you might say...



What I played this week - Fibble and SugarSync!

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Fibble HD is a 3D physics/puzzle game that is a beauty to behold on the iPad, but before I give my review, I have to do a mini-review of the awesomely redesigned SugarSync (which is not a game--sorry about that). The old version of SS (a cloud file syncing app--reviewed here), was not well suited to iPad, but the coders have fixed that in their recent upgrade! So before I tell you how great Fibble is, I want to tell you how great SugarSync has become...


SugarSync Review - Update enhances photo syncing!

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Every once in a while I post a review, and soon after the vendor responds with fixes for some of the minor issues or updates to features in the app. I'm sure the fixes were probably already in the pipeline, but I still like feeling maybe the review helped (I'm a deluded blogger, I know). Recently I reviewed SugarSync as part of an ongoing evaluation of products--a quest, you see, to find the perfect iPad-PC editing and syncronization app, and an excuse for writing more drivel in my blog here. SugarSync is a great cloud storage service, but I found some of the features of the iPad app a little light in a few areas, especially the photo uploading ability. Well, they went and enhanced it... Read on for the full press scoop...



SugarSync Review - Flexible Cloud storage for everything!

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SugarSync is a full-featured cloud backup and file syncing service (reviewed previously in our magazine by Doug Goldring here), but you can also create and edit documents on-line, play music from your synced collection, and transfer photos via iPad or other iOS device. There are clients for iOS, Android and several other mobile OS flavors, so you can sync from just about anywhere. I was specifically interested in the ability to write articles and save pictures and research to a consolidated folder I could later access on my computer. Currently, I use Evernote for the sometimes extensive article content I compile (mostly photo/text/weblink data), but it's somewhat aggravating to reformat everything for our blog editor later, so recently have taken to simply editing blog posts in raw HTML on our site (or in Notes), which is also a pain. SugarSync didn't bring my content together exactly the way I wanted, but it is a great file sync and backup product...



Syncing Files Online with Your iPad


SpiderOak, Dropbox, and SugarSync help you secure and access vital data online

They say you can't take it with you. The "it" in that saying originally referred to your personal wealth, but until recently, it also referred to personal information stored on your computer. For most of my life, data was a nearly immovable object, as heavy as your computer. Today, with mobile devices and the steadily improving effectiveness of cloud computing, it is easier than ever to back up, sync, and access important data without filling up your storage drive or adding a single ounce to your gear bag.



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Take Your Documents With You Wherever You Go!

Apps take advantage of "cloud" services and let you access your documents wherever you are.

Sometimes it seems that the more mobile I am, the less mobile my documents become! Let me explain. 


When I work at home, I occasionally use my desktop computers but write most of my documents on a Netbook. When I commute to work via the train, I use my iPad. Once I get to work, I spend the rest of the day on a desktop computer. Consequently, the documents I create reside on a number of devices, few of which play nicely with the others. I quickly realized that I needed an easy way to transfer files between these computers.


The solution for me was "the cloud." Google Docs, iDisk, and other cloud-based services let you store any file you’re working on to an online storage area.


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