iPhone Life magazine

Recent App Reviews

Doppler

 

Doppler's in-line browserDoppler is the most solid performer of all the native RSS apps I’ve tried. It has almost never crashed or hung up during operation. It includes a fairly attractive browser that presents individual feed items well. It also has a good range of action buttons for use with feed items, located along the bottom of the screen. These allow you to share or e-mail the item, open it in Safari, share it with a note, star it, or mark it as unread.

An individual feed item, displayed in Doppler’s in-line browser.

BoltReader

BoltReaderBoltReader also has a plain UI with muted colors and a grayscale look in various places. Its sync routine is divided into two parts: feeds and images. The syncing process is fairly slow, but you can view folders that are already updated while syncing is in progress.

BoltReader’s Folders view screen.

Byline

Byline RSS appByline was the very first native RSS app I tried on the iPhone. It is among the most stable of all iPhone RSS apps—it very rarely crashes or freezes up—and it usually does what it promises it will do. It offers full two-way sync with Google Reader, allowing you to star and share items, e-mail items, and create and share notes. It also has landscape mode, an inline browser to view full posts, and an offline reading capability.

Byline’s Folders View screen.

Google Reader

Google REaderDespite the fact that Web apps are viewed by some as the ugly stepchild of the iPhone, my most-used app is Google Reader. ReaderAddNoteIt’s like Marvelous Marvin Hagler—the fantastic, undisputed middleweight boxing champion back in the 1980s—because it’s so much better than its rivals. Part of the reason it’s such a great app is that Google has regularly and lovingly tweaked it, adding niceties that make it easier to use and features that bring it ever closer to the capabilities of its desktop counterpart.

Google Reader, the Undisputed RSS Champ

Although Google Reader is the champ, there are other RSS readers

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Virtual Fortune Update: Wiped Out!

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I wrote about winning (and losing) virtual fortunes in the summer issue of iPhoneLife magazine - available now at newsstands and bookstores. I'd won a measly quarter-million or so at the time. By the time the article was published, I was up to $1.5 million in poker winnings alone.

Now, thanks to iTunes, that million+ is gone, all gone. A few days ago I fired up iTunes and hooked up my iPhone to buy a new app and it told me there were apps it wasn't aware of. I said OK at the next dialog box and watched in horror as app after app was removed. They were gone before I could stop it.



Iceberg Reader eBooks

Iceberg Reader eBooksIceberg Reader eBooksMost closed reading systems offer classic books that are no longer subject to copyright and other restrictions. The exception to this is the Iceberg Reader system. Scrollmotion (the developers of Iceberg Reader) have partnered with Random House, Hachette, Penguin Putnam, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, and Simon & Schuster, and are able to offer a uniquely contemporary selection of books.

Classics

Classics eBook reading appClassics does not offer content that you can’t find elsewhere, but it does offer an incredibly unique interface that helps replicate the experience of reading a hardcover book.

Rather than displaying a list of books, the main interface is a digital bookshelf with cover images for each of the books in the library. Tap on an image to open the book and start reading it. Even the page turns are animated. Unfortunately, like a hardcover book, there is not much else you can do. Underneath the slick graphics and animation, this is really a no-frills reading experience.

Readdle eBooks

Readdle eBooksReaddle eBooksIn addition to the well-known document viewer, Readdle Docs, Readdle also publishes a number of eBook collections, including Shakespeare, Fairy Tales, Horror Books, Love Stories, and others. I tested their system out with Shakespeare and was quite impressed.

BeamItDown eBooks

BeamItDown eBooks is probably the most unique closed reading system. Instead of breaking text into pages, BeamItDown uses its “iFlow” technology to display the content as a continuous stream of text scrolling up your screen. You can sit back and watch as the text passes right before your eyes. (eReader offers this functionality as well.)

BeamItDown utilizes the unique iFlow technology to display the material without interference from cumbersome page changes or screen swipes.

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