iPhone Life magazine

Apps: Medical

iTunes App Store undergoing subtle but significant changes... with some difficulty

 If you've been paying close attention, as most developers do, to the App Store, you may have noticed some changes.

  1. New Releases only show BRAND NEW apps, i.e. version 1.0
  2. Updates are not included in the New Releases

This is potentially a good thing for users but there are some downsides.

The good news is, you won't have to search through old apps to find new gems.  It might also discourage developers from submitting minor updates just to be featured on the New Releases page.  That will also cut down on approval time as fewer apps need to be reviewed.



App Store hits 100,000 apps, over 2 billion downloads

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CNet is reporting today that the App Store has reached yet another milestone: 100,000 apps. That's just phenomenal. Well over 20,000 are games. By way of comparison, as of September, Nintendo DS had 3,500 titles and Sony PSP 600. The range of apps is astonishing. Every day I get press releases for apps for very specialized purposes. Just today they've included apps for insurance claim handling, high-risk obstetrics — and translating a baby's cries (Cry Translator).



A Developer's View on In-App Purchases for Free Apps

 Apple recently announced a major shift in how they treat free apps and I have been mulling over what it means to developers, in addition to end users.

In the past, "In-App Purchases", or the ability to add features to an app, were only available for paid apps.  Free apps could not be upgraded, short of purchasing the paid version separately.  Now, users of these free apps can purchase upgrades.

On one hand, more choices are a good thing.  But I have some concerns.



Three New Medical Apps from the University of Utah

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Researchers at the University of Utah have released three iPhone apps designed to "help scientists, students, doctors and patients study the human body, evaluate medical problems and analyze other three-dimensional images"

    *  ImageVis3D Mobile lets iPhone users easily display, rotate and otherwise manipulate 3-D images of medical CT and MRI scans, and a wide range of scientific images, from insects to molecules to engines. This free app is based on computer software from the university's Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute.



Pocket First Aid

PocketFirstAidEditors ChoiceThe app’s name says it all. Pocket First Aid provides you with instructions on how to provide first aid for almost any medical emergency. Whether you have to deal with choking, chest pains, or 
allergic reactions, this app provides you with instructions on what you’ll need to do if you or somebody near you experiences a medical emergency. This is an app you hope you never have to use—and one you don’t want to be caught without.

Pocket First Aid: important app you never want to use

iEmergency

iEmergencyiEmergencyMy mother is a registered nurse and she mentioned that people rarely think about how they would replace their medications if a natural disaster were to hit. Fortunately, there is a solution for that. iEmergency lets you record personal health-related and insurance information, as well as emergency contact numbers. You can specify whom to contact in case of emergency, hospital preference, as well as physicians’ names and numbers. You can also record the dosage and frequency of your medications and any allergies you have.

iChart EMR

iChartPatientListDo you need help moving into the 21st Century of Electronic Health Records? iChart EMR ($139.99) claims to be able to help you with that. Developed by Caretools Inc. to be an all-in-one tool for the busy physician or health care provider (PA, nurse, chiropractor, etc.), iChart helps you track patients and manage what they call the “Chart, Bill, and Fill,” process.

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