iPhone Life magazine

Apps: Medical

In Case of an Emergency, Please use ICE

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 As an emergency medicine physician, I know how much seconds count. It is extremely important to have the correct information when the patient can not give us key information. The idea behind In Case of Emergency is that it allows 1st responders a way to quickly access important information. Currently, the app store has several iphone apps that do this same function. The app called SMART ICE by EMS options LLC is a very good app. It contains all the information that one would need in the emergency setting and more. The app runs smooth and has several key features that I think are excellent. The top are:

1-) being able to prerecord information for the EMS

2-) Wall paper setting with information for EMS

3-) Quick EMS call from app



AED Nearby

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 AED Nearby

 

First Aid Corps and buuuk.com have created an iPhone app that can help you find an AED. The company is working on their database. If you find your self in this situation ask someone to call 911, begin CPR and ask someone for an AED. If one is not immediately available use this app to locate one. Hopefully, an ambulance will be there faster than you having to drive and get one.

 

Here is a video demo: Video

The direct iTunes link: click here

 



Under the Rubble in Haiti with Only an iPhone to Help Diagnose Injuries (video)

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My colleague Ben Stallings here at iPhone Life has just posted about how filmmaker Dan Woolley trapped under the earthquake rubble in Haiti for 65 hours used his iPhone to help in his survival.

He used the iPhone's internal alarm, and also Pocket First Aid and CPR (additional informationiTunes link).

Dan's inspirational story has been covered extensively online, on the radio and on television (NPR, MSNBC, Wired, Gizmodo, etc). 

Woolley, who is from Colorado Springs and was in Haiti to film a documentary about child advocacy group, spoke with WTVJ-TV in Miami about his ordeal: 

I had my iPhone with me and I had a medical app on there, so I was able to look up treatment of excessive bleeding and compound fracture," Woolley said. "So I used my shirt to tie my leg and a sock on the back of my head. And later used it for other things, like to diagnose shock: 




Merck Manual Home Edition

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 I like this app because it’s like having a first-aid instruction book with me all the time. I particularly like the Emergencies & Injuries section. If I need to know how to wrap a sprained ankle or perform the Heimlich maneuver, it’s right there in my iPhone, complete with instructions and illustrations.



iTunes App Store undergoing subtle but significant changes... with some difficulty

 If you've been paying close attention, as most developers do, to the App Store, you may have noticed some changes.

  1. New Releases only show BRAND NEW apps, i.e. version 1.0
  2. Updates are not included in the New Releases

This is potentially a good thing for users but there are some downsides.

The good news is, you won't have to search through old apps to find new gems.  It might also discourage developers from submitting minor updates just to be featured on the New Releases page.  That will also cut down on approval time as fewer apps need to be reviewed.



App Store hits 100,000 apps, over 2 billion downloads

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CNet is reporting today that the App Store has reached yet another milestone: 100,000 apps. That's just phenomenal. Well over 20,000 are games. By way of comparison, as of September, Nintendo DS had 3,500 titles and Sony PSP 600. The range of apps is astonishing. Every day I get press releases for apps for very specialized purposes. Just today they've included apps for insurance claim handling, high-risk obstetrics — and translating a baby's cries (Cry Translator).



A Developer's View on In-App Purchases for Free Apps

 Apple recently announced a major shift in how they treat free apps and I have been mulling over what it means to developers, in addition to end users.

In the past, "In-App Purchases", or the ability to add features to an app, were only available for paid apps.  Free apps could not be upgraded, short of purchasing the paid version separately.  Now, users of these free apps can purchase upgrades.

On one hand, more choices are a good thing.  But I have some concerns.



Three New Medical Apps from the University of Utah

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Researchers at the University of Utah have released three iPhone apps designed to "help scientists, students, doctors and patients study the human body, evaluate medical problems and analyze other three-dimensional images"

    *  ImageVis3D Mobile lets iPhone users easily display, rotate and otherwise manipulate 3-D images of medical CT and MRI scans, and a wide range of scientific images, from insects to molecules to engines. This free app is based on computer software from the university's Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute.



Pocket First Aid

PocketFirstAidEditors ChoiceThe app’s name says it all. Pocket First Aid provides you with instructions on how to provide first aid for almost any medical emergency. Whether you have to deal with choking, chest pains, or 
allergic reactions, this app provides you with instructions on what you’ll need to do if you or somebody near you experiences a medical emergency. This is an app you hope you never have to use—and one you don’t want to be caught without.

Pocket First Aid: important app you never want to use

iEmergency

iEmergencyiEmergencyMy mother is a registered nurse and she mentioned that people rarely think about how they would replace their medications if a natural disaster were to hit. Fortunately, there is a solution for that. iEmergency lets you record personal health-related and insurance information, as well as emergency contact numbers. You can specify whom to contact in case of emergency, hospital preference, as well as physicians’ names and numbers. You can also record the dosage and frequency of your medications and any allergies you have.

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