iPhone Life magazine

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Mark is a professional speaker, author, and blogger. Follow him on Twitter. Like him on Facebook. Connect with him on LinkedIn.

Tip of the Day: How to Control What Information Each App Can Access on Your iPhone or iPad

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Privacy is a huge topic these days. But despite this, how many of us download apps and accept the terms without even thinking about it, thus giving apps access to our contacts, location, social media accounts, and more?

If this describes you, no worries. I am going to tell you how you can check your privacy settings on your iDevice and revoke the access you absentmindedly gave to these apps.



Tip of the Day: How to Force an iCloud Sync

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iCloud is a great service...but it doesn't always behave.

Have you ever noticed that sometimes when you update your iOS Calendar or Reminder app on your iPhone the change doesn't happen quickly (or at all) on your iPad? I have.

But no worries; there is a quick and simple solution.



Why Apple Needs to Get Out of the Minor Apps Business

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Apple does so much right. iOS is not a perfect operating system but it is the best one out there. I can't speak for the Mac OS because, sadly, I don't own a non-iOS device (...yet). 

When I purchased my iPad Air a few months ago, I started using iWork's Numbers and Pages and found these apps incredible for spreadsheets and word processing. By the way, I wrote this article outside on my porch on my iPad Air using Pages. 



Tip of the Day: How to Create Custom Reminders in iOS Reminders

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When you set up reminders in the iOS Reminders app, you have six options for repeating:

  • Never (default)

  • Every Day

  • Every Week

  • Every two Weeks

  • Every Month

  • Every Year

But what if you need to repeat a reminder at a different interval? Maybe you want to be reminded every three weeks or every six months or weekdays only.



The iPad Reading Apps Battle: Round 2

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A few weeks ago, I wrote an article called "iPad Reading Apps: Kindle vs. iBooks" which received a lot of reads and comments. And I thank the many people who not only read the article but who took the time to respond. I enjoyed your many comments. Since that time, I have learned some new things about reading eBooks on the iPad.



iPad Reading Apps: Kindle vs. iBooks

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I am an avid reader. I try to read at least 52 books a year. And up until the fall of 2011, I fought the whole e-book trend. But on September 17, 2011, I received my first e-book reader: a Kindle keyboard. And my conversion from being a print book reader to an e-book reader began.  



The iDevice Default Setting You Probably Weren't Aware Of

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Many people don't realize that when they install an app onto their iDevice that by default, it's data is added to their iCloud backup. I didn't realize this until very recently and I've had an iPhone since November 2012!

Every iDevice user gets 5 GB of free iCloud storage from Apple. This is not 5 GB per iDevice but 5 GB per Apple ID. If you have an iPad and an iPhone, like I do, where you are using the same Apple ID, the cloud storage is shared. The problem with this default backup setting, is that unbeknownst to you, your storage could be eaten up with app data that doesn't need to be backed up.  



Why I Switched From Google Docs to Apple iWork

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I have been a fan of Google Drive for a while now. I mean, how can you go wrong with 100 GB of storage for $2 a month? I don't think you can.

And if you don't know, part of Google Drive is their software suite that includes  Docs (documents like MS Word) and Sheets (spreadsheets like MS Excel) to name two.  At first glance, I loved this set up.  Everything was in the cloud for me, accessible wherever I had an Internet connection.

Houston, we have a problem

But then I purchased a Wi-Fi iPad Air. That's when I discovered that there is a huge flaw in Google Drive: no Internet, no access!



How to Use Feedly, Pocket, and Evernote to Keep Up with Your Favorite Blogs

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Recently, I unsubscribed from all but a few of the email newsletters I receive. Now, when I write “newsletters”, I am referring to those emails that are blog posts. I didn’t unsubscribe from them because the emails were no longer relevant or important to me (they still were) but I did so for two reasons:

1. I was getting a lot of emails. Some sites I subscribe to post several times a day.

2. It was not easy to share the content with my followers on social media via email.



UPDATE: Can You Hear Me Now? (An Open Letter to Apple)

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A few weeks ago, I wrote a post titled, Can You Hear Me Now? (An Open Letter to Apple), where I wrote about my frustration at the volume levels put out by iTunes Radio and iTunes Match.  I received many comments to that post and instead of writing my findings as a comment, I wanted to write what I learned and what I did in a separate post.

I won't rehash what I wrote in the other post, if you didn't read it you can do so here.



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