iPhone Life magazine

Eric Pankoke has been a gamer for more than 20 years. He began with arcade games, moving to consoles and eventually handhelds and Pocket PCs. Now he spends most of his time on one of his iOS devices. Eric has written more than 700 gaming reviews, which have appeared on a number of gaming websites as well as several issues of both Smartphone & Pocket PC and iPhone Life magazines. He regularly contributes to iphonelife.com and TouchMyApps. Ultimately he hopes to eventually develop games himself for whatever the hot mobile device is when he finally gets moving.

City Birds: Farm Livin' Is The Life For Me (Game Review)

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City Birds (free from $0.99, Nov. 27-29)

3.5/5 stars

Matching fans are in for a treat should they decide to take City Birds for a spin. This game is pure casual action fun that’s not quite like anything I’ve played before on my iPad, and given the amount of games I have played, that says quite a bit. It’s easy to learn and quickly gets addictive. The problem is that once you’ve unlocked all the birds and completed all the challenges, which sadly doesn’t take as long as one would like, the game grows kind of stale. Hopefully updates that are in the works will address this issue so that this original game can remain fresh to its players for quite some time.



The Rats Online: Stuffin' And Lootin' Globally (Review)

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I used to start out just about every review of an online game making some sort of comment about how I don’t really like online games. I'm beginning to think that’s not really the case. What I don’t like are games where if you’re not in the “elite” you’re pretty much dead when you step out on the battlefield. I also don’t care for games where people pretty much expect you to chat or make the game as much about taunting as actually playing. Thankfully The Rats Online (free with IAP) handles all of these things in just the right manner. Its simple nature makes it easy to get into, and the nicely organized list of folks you need to exact revenge on makes it worth coming back in periodically to see how things are going.



Angry Birds Star Wars II: Angry Birds in a Galaxy Far, Far Away (Review)

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I’ve been a fan of Star Wars since before a vast majority of hardcore iOS players were born. And as much as I hate to admit it, I was sucked into the Angry Birds phenomenon just like so many other players. When the first Angry Birds Star Wars game was released, however, I was curious but also dumbfounded. Was Rovio that needy to expand the franchise—and for that matter, was LucasArts so desperate for some name recognition in the mobile world? I basically ignored the first installment; but when I saw they had released Angry Birds Star Wars II ($0.99), I decided it was time to see what the appeal was. In some ways I actually admire how they’ve melded together the two franchises. Overall though, I’m not finding the experience quite as entertaining as the original game that started it all. At least they were kind enough to include a playable Yoda character in the mix.



Brightstone Mysteries: Paranormal Hotel HD Takes Checking Out To A Whole New Level

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Paranormal Hotel HD (Free, $6.99 to unlock full game) is yet another G5 adventure game. Like many of the newer releases, it gravitates towards the actual adventure side of things with few mini-games and no hidden object scenes. The story is captivating, but the game play isn’t quite as strong as what I’ve come to expect from G5’s adventure offerings. There seems to be a lot of back and forth and dialogs with not so much puzzle solving in between. It still keeps me wanting to play, but more because I’m curious about what’s going to happen rather than looking forward to the next set of puzzles to solve.



My Singing Monsters: Muppets for a New Generation

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I am not a huge fan of in-app-purchase (IAP) driven games, though that seems to be the way that even the big developers are going these days. A little over a year ago Big Blue Bubble released one called My Singing Monsters (Free), and despite my disdain for the freemium model I decided to give it a shot anyway. It’s one of the few such games that remain on my device to this day. I don’t spend hours a day with it simply because I don’t want to fall into the trap of dishing out more dough through IAP than I would if I went and bought a console game, for example, but I still enjoy pulling it up every once in a while and seeing how my monsters are doing. Besides, how could you not enjoy a group of fun-loving, goofy creatures that like to sing? It worked for the Muppets, after all…



Dreamscapes: The Sandman Collector's Edition HD: Even Sleeping Isn't Safe (Review)

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If you happened to catch my review of Twin Moons HD, another G5 adventure game release, this one might sound similar in a lot of ways. Part of me wishes I could try more of the G5 releases as they come out, but the positive tradeoff seems to be that when I do finally get to play one, it usually turns out to be a good one. Of course there are still “levels of goodness” even among the really good games, and in that regard I’d say Dreamscapes: The Sandman Collector’s Edition HD (Free; $6.99 IAP to unlock full game) easily ranks in the top five and maybe even the top three games that I’ve played from G5. I just wish they’d stop writing these games with sequels in mind, because now I might just lose a little sleep waiting to find out what happens next.



Clay Jam: If Wallace & Grommitt Made Video Games (Review)

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Clay Jam (Free) is a game about clay. I'm really not sure what genre you'd classify the game under, but it's different, quirky, and most importantly, fun. There are times when the controls seem a bit unresponsive and some of the challenges definitely live up to the concept of a challenge, yet the overall demeanor of the game is lighthearted and whacky, and every gamer needs a selection or two like it to balance out the "serious" nature that so many modern games take. Games are supposed to help you escape from the real world, and Clay Jam does that quite well. 



Sprinkle Islands: Much More of a Good Thing (review)

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It’s hard enough creating one substantial game in a series, let alone a franchise that holds up over several iterations. Sprinkle is one example of how to do it right. The original Sprinkle was a surprise and a delight, and Sprinkle Jr. was entertaining, though it sat much better with my 8-year-old son who actually played it through at least three times. Now we have Sprinkle Islands ($1.99), and it looks to be everything the original Sprinkle was to a grander scale. My only grumble so far is that it didn’t do away with the need to play each world completely through to get to the next one.



Twin Moons HD: Forgetting the Past has Never Been so Interesting (Review)

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I don’t get a chance to play nearly as many G5 new releases as I’d like to, but when I do get the chance, I usually manage to pick the more interesting ones. Twin Moons HD (Free download; $6.99 IAP for full game) is no exception to that rule. Once I started playing the game, I played Twin Moons almost exclusively until I had completed it. I haven’t been quite that enthralled in an adventure game in a while.



The game has a pretty typical adventure game intro in the sense that you find yourself driving in a car and ultimately crashing in front of your desired destination. In this case, however, you’re not quite sure what you’re doing there, which is where the story comes in.  Aside from the fact that the story is interesting, I like the fact that it is mostly told via scene-triggered flashbacks and other things I won’t mention so as not to spoil the premise. 



Escape from the Dead HD: Fun But Not Scary (review)

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My first experience with Digi-Chain Games was Dungeon Of The Damned, which sadly showed lots of promise but in my opinion failed in execution. Since then, the company has stuck to good old-fashioned, point-and-click adventures and has produced some wonderfully entertaining games in the process. Its latest is Escape from the Dead HD ($0.99), and while the overall design choices prevent it from feeling like a true horror game, it still does what Digi-Chain does best—provide the end user with a solid, thoughtful, adventure game experience. I was only disappointed that the game is easier and more straightforward than past efforts, making it a shorter overall journey.



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