iPhone Life magazine

Daniel Rasmus's picture

Daniel W. Rasmus, the author of Listening to the Future and Management by Design, is a strategist, industry analyst, and business correspondent for iPhone Life magazine. Prior to starting his own consulting practice, Rasmus was the Director of Business Insights at Microsoft Corporation, where he helped the company envision how people will work in the future.

Before joining Microsoft, Rasmus was Research Vice President at the Giga Information Group and Forrester Research Inc. Rasmus also is an internationally recognized speaker. He blogs regularly for Fast Company and on his own blog, Your Future in Context. His education-related work can be found at Learning Reimagined.

Viralheat Lets Businesses Feel Social Media Burn

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Businesses need to manage social media in an efficient and effective way. As popular client software like TweetDeck—once a cross-platform social media management tool of choice—became the captive property of Twitter, such social media management apps options narrowed.

Enter Viralheat (free). Viralheat is an app and service that offers comprehensive management of all major social networks. The iPhone app offers the ability to create posts for Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Facebook pages associated with an account. The application also permits the future scheduling of posts.  

Getting started with the app is as simple as creating a new Viralheat account or logging in with Twitter or Facebook (I always recommend a separate account should any party involved become untrustworthy).



Top 6 External Batteries for iOS from Lenmar and Powerocks

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We all need power. We aren't sure how much, but a constant stream certainly makes us feel better than an unsteady one. If you are going somewhere without power or if a storm or other natural disaster is heading your way, you may want to consider an external battery for your iPhone and iPad to make sure you stay covered. Check out these collections from Lenmar and Powerocks

Before I review my collection of external batteries, let me digress. Recently, I watched the 1979 television show Connections with James Burke. The first episode, called "The Trigger Effect," chronicled the 1965 Northeast Blackout that started in a Niagara Falls substation and cascaded throughout Northeast Canada and the United States. Burke examined the power failure from a 1979 perspective, a year with no mobile computing, very few personal computers, and a handful of primitive game consoles. In 1979 social media hadn’t been invented—people dialed up computer forums with 300bps modems.



3 New Keyboards Provide More Options for iPad Typists

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New iOS keyboards continue to venture forth. Here are my thoughts on the latest arrivals:

 
The Belkin FastFit Keyboard cover is designed to compete with the Zagg PROplus iPad Keyboard ($129.99) and the Logitech Ultrathin Keyboard Cover ($99.99). Unlike those two cases, the Belkin FastFit offers two viewing angles, which means you'll have a lot of open space on the far end of the keyboard, in fact, too much when you see it next to these other keyboards. As with most portable keyboards, Belkin misses a key touch typing element: the full-sized shift key on the right-hand side of the keyboard. Push everything back a half-inch or so and the same arrangement of keys can be easily accommodated. I'm not sure why keyboard manufacturers continue to make this fundamental mistake when Zagg, Logitech, and Clamcase clearly demonstrate keyboards that easily make room for a full-sized right shift key.



Moxtra App Brings Collaboration to iOS

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Moxtra (free) brings together real-time collaboration and personal knowledge management in an app designed to help people collect their artifacts of work or play. Moxtra lets you not only share your projects with others, but work on them together across a variety of mobile modalities. Many people compare Moxtra to Evernote or to Microsoft’s OneNote, and to be honest, there are overlaps.

There is nothing new about collaboration. Lotus Development, now part of IBM Corporation, created the first large-scale enterprise solution with Lotus Notes. Developers designed and built Lotus Notes and all other current collaboration solutions during the era of client-server computing, where internal servers hosted databases accessed by desktop computers. We now live in a post-PC world where devices need different tools and workers have widely different expectations.



These Speakers Mean Business: Soundfreaq & G-Project

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Increasingly, businesses rely on audio and video technology for enterprise training, conference calls, not to mention spring and summer office parties! Therefore, I'm reviewing two new speakers, not through the lens of the audiophile, but of the business user for a change.



HyperOffice for iPad: Aiding Collaboration at Canter Companies

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Collaboration is important to businesses large and small. It helps bring distributed teams together, facilitates better decisions, and keeps everyone in the loop. Collaboration also is a great reason to deploy iPads. When you need something, you need it now, not when you get back to your desktop. When you learn something, you want to capture it immediately. When someone needs you, you want to be able to respond quickly. Collaboration is very personal.



The Yin and Yang of Backpacks: Hex Tribute Cloak Backpack vs. Pelican ProGear U140

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How many backpacks do you own? Some people only see the need for one bag or backpack, which becomes a familiar companion on any trip. Others are bag junkies, and I’m one of those people. 

I have a plethora of bags for trips long and short, meetings formal and casual. I recently received two very different backpacks for review. While they're roughly the same size, only the shoulder straps make these bags anything alike. You can’t go wrong with either bag, but each is designed for very different environments and for travelers with different expectations.



At Work: A Guide to Finding the Best Stylus for Your iDevice

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The current issue of iPhone Life (May-June 2013) includes an @Work article I wrote called “The Right Touch,” in which I cover the best stylus products on the market. While researching, I reviewed many innovative styluses, which I rated based upon usability, design, unique features, durability, and price. See the table at the end of this post for details.

Here is a list of the winners from the print edition, and a compresensive guide to the run-over stylus products I enjoyed but couldn't find room for in the magazine.



Apple Pie's Kraft 3-Pack iPad Cases — Customizable, Recyclable, Cheap!

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Most iPad cases are expensive and are often made of imported plastic or pleather. Packaging, transportation, and processing all add to the price of the product. If you're interested in keeping costs down, supporting an American company, and buying an environmentally friendly product, you may want to consider the new Apple Pie's iPad Case Kraft 3 Pack ($16.99, On sale from $19.99).



2 Unique iOS Keyboards for Conducting Mobile Business

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If you're anything like me, your desk is covered in stuff: pens, paperclips, business cards, CDs, receipts, a stylus or two, a mini flashlight, rubber bands, and memory cards. You get the point. And, if you're like me, your desk drawers are filled with too much stuff for you to find anything you need at the moment.



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