iPhone Life magazine

Review: Green Jelly HD by G5 Games

G5 is probably best known for their adventure and hidden object games, but they have been branching out into other genres including time management and more recently physics puzzle games.  Jumpster was an interesting first effort in the latter genre whose initial release was ultimately marred by an almost absolute necessity to buy IAP in order to play for any length of time.  Green Jelly is their second physics puzzle release and it has managed to make a much better impression on me overall, except for the less than amicable controls.  At least there's no IAP though.

It's Shocking!
 

Your quest is to help a little green jelly collect all the candy it has lost.  In order to accomplish this you'll have to use the strategically placed pegs throughout each level to stretch, flick and slice the jelly to its house.  Along the way you'll have to dodge spinning blades, slip though laser beams, avoid long hooks and generally deal with lots of environmental opposition.  The pegs will even start moving on you in some cases.  Through it all you need to stay in one piece, make it home and hopefully collect the three pieces of candy that can be found on the level.  You don’t need all the candy to pass a level, but you will need a certain amount of sweets to unlock each new world.

Controlling the jelly seems simple enough.  Touch and drag to attach the jelly to a nearby peg, or once he’s attached to one or more pegs drag to stretch it and the launch it where you want to go next.  If you stretch the jelly far enough you get a nice little line showing its trajectory.  Assuming it makes sense you can even just slice the jelly’s “tentacles” to get it to fall from the peg.  The problem is in the execution.  Quite often it’s hard to get hold of the jelly in the first place.  Then it’s not uncommon to accidentally let go when you’re trying to stretch it, even though you didn’t realize you let go (because you technically probably didn’t).  Amazingly enough I’ve managed to earn 3 candies on 56 of the 60 available levels so far, but there were certainly times where I felt I’d be better served chucking my device out the window.

Stretched To The Limit
 

Besides trying to get the 3 candies, each level has a score that is comprised of 1000 points for completing the level, 1000 points for each candy and then a time bonus.  Assuming you’re pretty good about getting the 3 candies then your main motive for replaying the levels might be to raise your score by getting a higher time bonus – or if you’re like me getting any time bonus at all.  There are also 20 achievements to earn, most of which should be fulfilled simply because you’ll have to play many of the levels several times to truly complete them.

The graphics are cute, with plenty of sparkles and bits of animation where appropriate.  The highlight of the whole thing is the green jelly itself, which can actually be quite expressive given the right circumstances.  The music is nice, though it would be better if there was a separate track for each level.  If pretty much forgotten what the sound effects were like because one of the traps was so annoying I actually turned the sounds off.  I almost never do that in a game.

I'm Hooked On You
 

For the most part Green Jelly takes the best ideas of several physics puzzle games that have come before it and melded them into a solid, enjoyable game.  The atmosphere is fun, the levels are intelligent and sometimes inventive, and there’s no question that you will be challenged.  I just wish the challenge came strictly from the obstacles and not from the controls.  And please get rid of the annoying noises so I can turn my sound effects back on.

Overall Score: 7/10
App Store Link

This game was reviewed on an iPad 2 running iOS 6.0.1.

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Eric Pankoke has been a gamer for more than 20 years. He began with arcade games, moving to consoles and eventually handhelds and Pocket PCs. Now he spends most of his time on one of his iOS devices. Eric has written more than 700 gaming reviews, which have appeared on a number of gaming websites as well as several issues of both Smartphone & Pocket PC and iPhone Life magazines. He regularly contributes to iphonelife.com and TouchMyApps. Ultimately he hopes to eventually develop games himself for whatever the hot mobile device is when he finally gets moving.