iPhone Life magazine

iPhone Application Development—A Developer's Paradise

Apple has more than one reason to cheer. Since the launch of the iPhone, the wind has been blowing in favor of Apple. The combination of the iPhone's quality and Apple's smart marketing campaigns has helped Apple create an unbeatable brand image. This has yielded enormous profits, and Apple has accumulated a huge pile of cash.

And Apple continues to do well in the most lucrative markets, while Android is a big success only in emerging markets. Americans love Apple and it still has a stranglehold on the U.S. Smartphone market. And it is not just smartphone users who love Apple devices, even developers enjoy creating apps for the iPhone.

Developing apps for the iPhone is way simpler than building apps for Android or any other mobile platforms. So, why is iPhone application development a fantastic option for developers? Here's why:

1. Automatic, Regular, Over-the-Air OS Updates

Developers build apps for the best devices using the latest operating system

Apple's customers like to use the latest devices, and Apple likes its devices to run the latest operating system. Most users update to the latest version of the operating system within a few days of its release. This is not the case with most other mobile platforms.

As a developer, you can depend on iPhone users to download the latest operating system. So, you do not have to worry about the capability of Apple devices and can create cutting-edge apps with the latest OS features.

2. Two Devices, Single Version of Operating System

Developers do not have to worry about device or OS fragmentation.

Apple built an operating system, devices for the operating system, and runs the app store where apps for these devices are sold. People have criticized this closed system a lot, but it gives Apple a lot of control over the performance and capability of its apps. As an iOS developer, you have work with iOS – a system with centralized consistency. You also work with tools like Cocoa Touch, Media, and Mac OS X Kernel – each of these tools has a specific set of functions to fulfill.

This makes the basic process of coding and creating apps simple and easy to understand. On top of that, there are just two devices that you need to keep in mind – iPhone and iPad (iPad apps work perfectly in iPad mini). So, as developers, you get to use the best SDKs and get to create powerful apps for the best devices in the market. When creating apps for Android, it's more difficult to design for users who have different devices running different versions of the operating system.

3. Apple Developers make More Money

iPhone users are happy to spend money on the app stores, buying apps

Apple has extremely strict policies for app submission and approval. The app you submit is vetted by humans—any problem with the app, and it won't get approved. This is a bit of a headache for developers trying to get their first app in the App Store, but offers a lot of returns in the long term.

There is no problem of piracy in Apple's App Store and iPhone users are more willing to spend money to buy good apps. So developers have a good chance of making money from their apps when they develop for Apple. Simply put, Apple developers make more money.

Give it a Try

iPhone application development is a vast yet dynamic field. As a developer, don't be afraid to experiment with the various possibilities of an iPhone app. You have every reason to be excited about iPhone app development, as it is only going to get bigger and better in the future. Why? Because no one else can offer the quality Apple can. Whether you want to make money or create next-gen apps, iPhone application development will satisfy you.

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Carlos Wilson's picture
Carlos works for MyFirstMobileApp.com, a leading Mobile Application Development Company providing custom mobile app solutions for various platforms like iPhone, iPad, Android, and Windows phone. He is a water person, loves underwater diving, and also enjoys reading science journals. You can follow him on Google+, Twitter, and Facebook.