iPhone Life magazine

Gogo Sushi Review: Keeping it Fresh

 

Ozgnahc, Inc. brings us a game with a presently unwieldy title in the App Store: Gogo Sushi Tap Tap Tycoon Fun Game App of Speedy Touch. We’ll be referring to it as Gogo Sushi for short.

The name might give native English speakers a giggle, but it’s a pretty good description of premise behind Gogo Sushi. Essentially, the player is looking to become a master sushi chef while constantly improving his or her restaurant.  There’s a hint of a backstory—you’ve reached the age where you’re ready to become a sushi-serving part of the family business, but a competitor (a big, bad supermarket) is threatening to edge your grandfather’s restaurant out of business.  This sensible motivator is presented like most of the info in the game, via a pop-up at the beginning of a shift.

 

The controls are pretty simple—you are are indeed tap-tapping your way to tycoon status.  Keep an eye on the customers. Their sushi craving will appear in images above their heads.  Your sushi supplies are arranged to your satisfaction on your side of the bar. As you tap each ingredient, it’s added to the sushi mat in front of you.  Finished? Tap the customer who ordered it. If you screwed up, they’ll give you a fussy expression and some expressive thought bubbles; get it right, and get showered in hearts.

What’s to love about Gogo Sushi? It’s a fun game of speedy touch.  Seriously though, that’s where it gets good.  The game was a little blah when I started out (though you can avoid that by reading the rest of this paragraph) but once I got going, it was addictive. There’s a fine line between filling the sushi assembly line so no one complains, and holding back to make sure they get exactly the sushi they love.  I personally like games that rely on quick reaction times, but have a simple enough premise that you can put it down for two weeks and not forget what you’re up to.  What’s not to like about the game? There’s nothing to complain about with the actual gameplay.  It has great pacing, and the challenge increases at a satisfying rate.  However, the overall interface could use some polishing, or maybe some localization. Read the tutorial and the FAQ (the question mark icon on the menu page). Gogo Sushi may be perfectly simplified for casual play, but it is not self-explanatory, in-game. Both the sushi-making and the market-shopping made me tantrum until I read the instructions. It’s always a good idea anyway, but it’s an absolute necessity with this game.  Do that first, and if you don’t mind some poor translation here and there, you’ll be hooked quick.

 

 

Visually, Gogo Sushi exhibits polish.  It’s not innovative, but it’s cute and clean and pleasant.  The level of polish in the game design and graphics makes me think some of the counter-intuitive interface might come from its developers being used to a non-Western set-up, but I’m only guessing here. The music and effects are typical for casual games, which means bright, lively, and immediately turned off in my case. They’re of above average quality for the App Store.

At $1.99 (iTunes Link), you might be wondering if this game is worth it.  My verdict: try the free version first (Free Version iTunes Link), read the FAQ, and see if the translation hiccups bother you. It’s worth it for me—I’m really impressed with the content (lots of extra items, apparently endless levels) and pacing. It’s a perfect zone-out-the-real-world game.  I was already a sushi addict; now I’m a Gogo Sushi addict.

Email icon
Want more? Get our weekly newsletter:
I have been using Apple products for over 10 years and absolutely love iOS apps. I try to keep up-to-date with the latest and hottest apps so please let me know if I missed anything!